Andries de Grip is Director of the Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA),Chair of the Board of the Network Social Innovation (NSI) and Professor of Economics at the School of Business and Economics, Maastricht University. In his research he has focused on various aspects of the relation between human capital development and the developments on the labour market. His current research interests include human capital development and depreciation, relations between ageing and retirement, worker-job mismatch, atypical employment, and firms' human resource management.

He has published in among others Economic Journal, Management Science, Research Policy, Applied Economics, De Economist, Economics of Education Review, Economics and Human Biology, Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Economics Letters, Economic Modeling, Environment and Planning A, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, International Labour Review, International Journal of HRM, International Journal of Forecasting, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Labour Economics, Oxford Economic Papers, R&D Management,Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health and Vocations and Learning.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in July 2007.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 10611
published in: Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, 2017, 68, 18-24

The Dunning–Kruger effect states that low performers vastly overestimate their performance while high performers more accurately assess their performance. Researchers usually interpret this empirical pattern as evidence that the low skilled are vastly overconfident while the high skilled are more accurate in assessing their skill. However, measurement error alone can...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10407

We show that household heads with a strong internal economic locus of control are more likely to hold equity and hold a larger share of equity in their investment portfolio. This relation holds when we control for economic preferences and possible confounders such as financial literacy, overconfidence, optimism, trust, and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10302
published in: Solomon W. Polachek , Konstantinos Pouliakas , Giovanni Russo , Konstantinos Tatsiramos (ed.) Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets (Research in Labor Economics, Volume 45) Emerald Publishing Limited, pp.345 - 407

This paper provides more insight into the relevance of the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers' skills. We analyse the extent to which training and informal learning on the job are related to employee skill development and consider...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9697
published in: Economics of Education Review, 2017, 57, 52-65

Building on Lazear's skill weights approach, we study the effect of having more or less heterogeneity in the training curriculum on supply of and demand for apprenticeship training. Modernizations of training curricula provide us with a quasi-experimental setting as these modernizations can be seen as a relatively exogenous shock. We...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9627
forthcoming in: Labour Economics

Active Labour Market Policies often exclusively target towards the long-term unemployed. Although it might be more efficient to intervene earlier in order to prevent long-term unemployment rather than to cure it, the climate of austerity in Eurozone countries is spreading a tendency to further reduce the basic counselling for those...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9430
Forthcoming in: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 2018

Using data from a stated preferences experiment in the Netherlands, we find that replacing full-time pension schemes with schemes that offer gradual retirement opportunities induce workers to retire one year later on average. Total life-time labour supply, however, decreases with 3.4 months because the positive effect of delayed retirement on...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9322

Several studies have shown that employees with temporary contracts have lower training participation than those with permanent contracts. There is, however, no empirical literature on the difference in informal learning on the job between permanent and temporary workers. In this paper, we analyse this difference across 20 OECD countries using...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9081
Gabriele Marconi, Andries de Grip

We develop a general equilibrium overlapping generations model which is based on the view that education makes workers more productive by increasing their ability to learn from work experience, rather than providing skills that directly increase productivity. One important implication of the model is that the enrolment rate to education...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9011
published in: Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, 2017, 68, 79–90

This paper uncovers 'conspicuous work' as a new form of status seeking that can explain social interactions in labour supply. We analyse how peer working time relates to both labour supply and happiness for Dutch male workers. Using a unique measure of peer weekly working time, we find that men's...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8862

This paper investigates whether employers can induce employees to postpone retirement by offering access to training courses that maintain job proficiency. We use unique, matched employer–employee surveys for the Dutch public sector, which include detailed information on a wide range of HR practices applied in the organization, as well as...