Marco Caliendo is Professor of Empirical Economics at the University of Potsdam. He studied economics at the University of Manchester and the Goethe-University of Frankfurt where he also received his PhD in April 2005. From January 2005 until July 2007 he worked for the DIW in Berlin as a Senior Research Associate in the Public Economics Department.

His current research interests include the evaluation of labor market programs, job search and unemployment dynamics, self-employment/entrepreneurship, the influence of personality traits on economic outcomes, and applied microeconometrics. His work has been published in journals such as Review of Economics and Statistics, European Economic Review, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Population Economics, Journal of Economic Psychology and Small Business Economics.

He joined IZA as a Senior Research Associate in August 2007 and served as Deputy Program Director for the IZA research area "Evaluation of Labor Market Programs" until January 2009. From February 2009 until September 2011 he served as Director of Research at IZA. Since October 2011 Marco Caliendo has been acting as Program Director of IZA’s research area “Evaluation of Labor Market Programs”.

You can access most of his papers also on RePEC at



IZA Discussion Paper No. 11246
Marco Caliendo, Alexandra Fedorets, Malte Preuß, Carsten Schröder, Linda Wittbrodt

This study quantifies the short-term distributional effects of the new statutory minimum wage in Germany. Using detailed survey data (German Socio-Economic Panel), we assess changes in the distributions of hourly wages, contractual and actual working hours, and monthly earnings. Our descriptive results indicate growth at the bottom of the hourly...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11190
Marco Caliendo, Alexandra Fedorets, Malte Preuß, Carsten Schröder, Linda Wittbrodt

We assess the short-term employment effects of the introduction of a national statutory minimum wage in Germany in 2015. For this purpose, we exploit variation in the regional treatment intensity, assuming that the stronger a minimum wage "bites" into the regional wage distribution, the stronger the regional labour market will...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11169

The appealing idea of geographically relocating unemployed job seekers from depressed to prosperous regions and hence reducing unemployment leads to industrialised countries offering financial support to unemployed job seekers when searching for and/or accepting jobs in distant regions. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the existence of these...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11055

Start-up subsidies for the unemployed have long been an important active labor market policy strategy in Germany. The current subsidy program underwent a major reform in 2011 that changed its key parameters: support was lowered, eligibility criteria were tightened and entitlement was abandoned by granting caseworkers the right to reject...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10406

This paper extends standard models of work-related training by explicitly incorporating workers' locus of control into the investment decision. Our model both differentiates between general and specific training and accounts for the role of workers and firms in training decisions. Workers with an internal locus of control are predicted to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10177
published in: Labour Economics, 2016, 42, 177-193

In some countries including Germany unemployed workers can increase their income by working a few hours per week. The intention is to keep unemployed job seekers attached to the labour market and to increase their job-finding probabilities. To analyze the unemployment dynamics of job seekers with and without marginal employment,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9628
published in: European Economic Review, 2016, 86, 87-108

Many countries support business start-ups to spur economic growth and reduce unemployment with different programmes. Evaluation studies of such programmes commonly rely on the conditional independence assumption (CIA), allowing a causal interpretation of the results only if all relevant variables affecting participation and success are accounted for. While the entrepreneurship...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9600

Internal migration can substantially improve labor market efficiency. Consequently, policy is often targeted towards reducing the barriers workers face in moving to new labor markets. In this paper we explicitly model internal migration as the result of a job search process and demonstrate that assumptions about the timing of job...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9488
published in: IZA Journal of Labor Policy, 2016, 5 (1), 1-30 [Open Access]

Since the economic crisis in 2008, European youth unemployment rates have been persistently high at around 20% on average. The majority of European countries spends significant resources each year on active labor market programs (ALMP) with the aim of improving the integration prospects of struggling youths. Among the most common...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9183
revised version published in: Journal of Public Economics, 2017, 148, 136-151

In many European countries, labor markets are characterized by high regional disparities in terms of unemployment rates on the one hand and low geographical mobility among the unemployed on the other hand. This is somewhat surprising and raises the question of why only minor shares of unemployed job seekers relocate...