W. Craig Riddell is Royal Bank Faculty Research Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of British Columbia and Academic Director of the Canadian Labour Market and Skills Researcher Network. His teaching and research interests are in labour economics, labour relations and public policy. Current research is focused on skill formation, education and training, unemployment and labour market dynamics, experimental and non-experimental approaches to the evaluation of social programs, unionization and collective bargaining, and unemployment insurance and social assistance.

He is co-author of Labour Market Economics: Theory, Evidence and Policy in Canada, Canada's leading labour economics textbook. Professor Riddell is former Head of the Department of Economics at UBC, Past-President of the Canadian Economics Association and former Academic Co-Chair of the Canadian Employment Research Forum. He currently serves as Chair of Statistics Canada’s Advisory Committee on Labour and Income Statistics, as a member of the Board of Directors of the Centre for the Study of Living Standards, and as Academic Director of the Canadian Labour Market and Skills Researcher Network. In 2007-8 he was a member of the Expert Panel on Older Workers established by the Government of Canada.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in October 2009.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10769

We analyze changes in unemployment, marginal labor force attachment and participation in Canada and the U.S.. Using two complementary decompositions, we show the importance for the comparative evolution of aggregate unemployment of changes in the fraction of the non-employed who are unemployed and in the fraction of the unemployed who...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10017

We study the relationship between age and literacy skills using data from the IALS, ALL and PIAAC surveys. In cross-sectional data there is a negative partial relationship between literacy skills and age that is statistically significant indicating that literacy declines with age, especially after age 45. However, this relationship could...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9939

The Self-Sufficiency Project was a well-known welfare-to-work experiment that provided a generous but time-limited financial incentive to leave welfare and enter the workforce. Experimental evidence showed large short-term impacts but no lasting effects. We argue that these conclusions need to be re-assessed. Policy changes implemented during the SSP implied the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9037

This paper looks at the evolution of incomes at the top of the distribution in Canada. Master files of the Canadian Census are used to study the composition of top income earners between 1981 and 2011. Our main finding is that, as in the United States, executives and individuals working...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8682

Canada's immigration system is currently undergoing significant change driven by several goals that include (1) a desire to improve the economic outcomes of entering immigrants; (2) an attempt to better respond to short-term regional labor market shortages often associated with commodity booms, and (3) a desire to shift immigration away...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6424

We study the relationship between age and literacy skills in Canada, Norway and the U.S. – countries that represent a wide range of literacy outcomes – using data from the 1994 and 2003 International Adult Literacy Surveys. In cross-sectional data there is a weak negative partial relationship between literacy skills...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6378
published in: Journal of Public Economics, 2014, 117, 39-49

This paper investigates whether policies that encourage recipients to exit welfare for full-time employment influence participation in educational activity. The Self-Sufficiency Project ('SSP') was a demonstration project where long-term welfare recipients randomly assigned to the treatment group were offered a generous earnings supplement if they exited welfare for full-time employment....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6377

Adoption of innovations by firms and workers is an important part of the process of technological change. Many prior studies find that highly educated workers tend to adopt new technologies faster than those with less education. Such positive correlations between the level of education and the rate of technology adoption,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6134

This study assesses the effects of education on both job search intensity and re-employment success for unemployed workers. Given that the positive correlation between education and job search intensity or re-employment success is likely to be confounded by the endogeneity of education, we make use of data on compulsory schooling...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5577

The unemployment protection systems that exist in most Latin American economies are generally considered inadequate in terms of providing insurance to workers. They may also encourage stratified labor markets and impose barriers to the employee’s mobility and the firm's adjustment to changing labor market conditions. In addition, some of these...

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