Boris Hirsch

Research Fellow

Leuphana University Lüneburg

Boris Hirsch has been full professor of Economics, in particular Microeconometrics and Policy Evaluation, at the Leuphana University of Lüneburg since August 2016. He studied economics and mathematics at the Universities of Erlangen-Nuremberg and Hagen. In 2009, he received his doctorate degree from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg where he was postdoctoral researcher from 2009-2016.

His research interests lie in the theory and empirics of imperfectly competitive labour markets, empirical labour economics, industrial relations, and migration. His research appeared in outlets such as the Economic Journal, the Journal of Labor Economics, the Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Economics Letters, and Labour Economics.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in August 2014.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11309

This paper investigates the influence of industrial relations on firm wage premia in Germany. OLS regressions for the firm effects from a two-way fixed effects decomposition of workers' wages by Card, Heining, and Kline (2013) document that average premia are larger in firms bound by collective agreements and in firms...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9635

Using administrative data for West Germany, this paper investigates whether part of the urban wage premium stems from fierce competition in thick labour markets. We first establish that employers possess less wage-setting power in denser markets. Local differences in wage-setting power predict 1.1-1.6% higher wages from a 100 log points...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9015
published in: Oxford Economic Papers, 2017, 69 (4), 1010-1031

Presenteeism, i.e. attending work while sick, is widespread and associated with significant costs. Still, economic analyses of this phenomenon are rare. In a theoretical model, we show that presenteeism arises due to differences between workers in (health-related) disutility from workplace attendance. As these differences are unobservable by employers, they set...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8804
published in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2016, 69 (5), 1191-1215

Fitting duration models on an inflow sample of jobs in Germany starting in 2002-2010, this paper investigates the impact of employers' use of temporary agency work on regular workers' job stability. In line with dual labour market theory, I find that non-temp jobs are significantly more stable if employers utilise...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8417
published in: Labour, 2015, 29 (4), 327-347

Using linked employer-employee panel data for Germany, this paper investigates whether firms implement real wage reductions in a selective manner. In line with insider-outsider and several strands of efficiency wage theory, we find strong evidence for selective wage cuts with high-productivity workers being spared even when controlling for permanent differences...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8317
published in: IZA Journal of Labor Economics, 2014, 3:19

Using linked employer-employee panel data for West Germany that include direct information on the competition faced by plants, we investigate the effect of product market competition on the gender pay gap. Controlling for match fixed effects we find that intensified competition significantly lowers the unexplained gap in plants with neither...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8242

This paper is the first to show theoretically and empirically how firms' production technology affects the choice of their preferred wage formation regime. Our theoretical framework predicts, first, that the larger the total factor productivity of a firm, the more likely it is to opt for centralized wage formation where...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7776
substantially revised version published as "Do employers have more monopsony power in slack labor markets?" forthcoming in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review

This paper investigates the behaviour of employers' monopsony power and workers' wages over the business cycle. Using German administrative linked employer-employee data for the years 1985-2010 and an estimation framework based on duration models, we construct a time series of the firm-level labour supply elasticity and estimate its relationship to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7240
published in: Labour Economics, 2014, 30, 212-222

This paper analyzes wage assimilation of ethnic German immigrants to Germany. We use unique administrative data that include a standardized measure of immigrants' pre-migration wage based on occupation, industry, tenure, qualification, and the German wage structure. We find that immigrants experience a substantial initial wage disadvantage compared to natives. During...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6472
substantially revised version published in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2015, 68 (3), 501-528

This paper investigates immigrants' and natives' labour supply to the firm within a semi-structural approach based on a dynamic monopsony framework. Applying duration models to a large administrative employer–employee data set for Germany, we find that once accounting for unobserved worker heterogeneity immigrants supply labour less elastically to firms than...

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