Christine Binzel is Professor of Economics: Economy and Society of the Middle East at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU). Her research interests are in the fields of development economics, applied microeconomics, and behavioral economics, with a particular focus on the Middle East and North Africa. Christine Binzel studied economics at Hamburg University, Aarhus University, and Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne, and received her PhD in economics from Humboldt University of Berlin in 2010. After a one-year appointment as Visiting Assistant Professor at Dartmouth College in 2010/2011, she joined Heidelberg University as a postdoctoral researcher. During this time, she was a visiting scholar at Harvard Kennedy School (2012) and at UC Berkeley (2014).

She joined IZA as a Research Affiliate in November 2010 and became a Research Fellow in July 2014.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 7516
published in: Economics Letters, 2013, 121(2), 214-217

Among residents of an informal housing area in Cairo, we examine how dictator giving varies by the social distance between subjects – friend versus stranger – and by the anonymity of the dictator. While giving to strangers is high under anonymity, we find – consistent with Leider et al. (2009)...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7259
revised version forthcoming in: Economic Journal

This paper examines the economic origins of the Islamic revival that took place in Egypt in the 1970-80s, and in Muslim societies more generally. We provide the first systematic evidence of a decline in social mobility among educated youth in Egypt. Developing a behavioral model of religion, we then characterize...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7183
published in: Journal of Development Economics, 2013, 103, 99-106

While strong social ties help individuals cope with missing institutions, trade is essentially limited to those who are part of the social network. We examine what makes the decision to trust a stranger different from the decision to trust a member of a given social network (a friend), by comparing...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6139

This paper studies how the gradual suspension of an employment guarantee scheme for secondary and post-secondary graduates has affected intergenerational mobility across well-educated cohorts in Egypt. The empirical results support suggestive evidence in the Middle East of a decline in social mobility among the increasingly well-educated youth. The results further...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5589
revised version published in: Labour Economics, 2011, 18 (S1), S98-S114

Female labor force participation has remained low in Egypt. This paper examines whether male international migration provides a leeway for women to enter the labor market and/or to increase their labor supply. In line with previous studies, we find a decrease in wage work in both rural and urban areas....