Stephen Machin is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Previously he has been visiting Professor at Harvard University (1993/4) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2001/2). He was an independent member of the Low Pay Commission in the UK and is a Fellow of the British Academy. He has been President of the European Association of Labor Economists (2009-11) and is a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in November 2002.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9955
forthcoming in American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 2018

Significant numbers of people have very low levels of literacy in many OECD countries and, because of this, face significant labour market penalties. Despite this, it remains unclear what teaching strategies are most useful for actually rectifying literacy deficiencies. The subject remains hugely controversial amongst educationalists and has seldom been...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9914
published in: Journal of Labor Economics, 2018, 36, 159-95

How does the value of a firm change in response to a minimum wage hike? The evidence we have to date is not well-suited to answer this question, principally because events that have been studied are not completely unknown to the stock market or have uncertainty associated with them. This...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9276
forthcoming in Journal of the European Economic Association, 2018

We study the origins of what has become one of the most radical and encompassing programmes of school reform seen in the recent past amongst advanced countries – the introduction of academy schools to English secondary education. Academies are state schools that are allowed to run in an autonomous manner...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9109
forthcoming in Review of Economic Studies, 2018

In economic models of crime individuals respond to changes in the potential value of criminal opportunities. We analyse this issue by estimating crime-price elasticities from detailed data on criminal incidents in London between 2002 and 2012. The unique data feature we exploit is a detailed classification of what goods were...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8332
forthcoming in Review of Economics and Statistics, 2018

Recessions lead to short-term job loss, lower levels of happiness and decreasing income levels. There is growing evidence that workers who first join the labour market during economic downturns suffer from poor job matches that have a sustained detrimental effect on their wages and career progression. This paper uses a...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7600
published in: Journal of Urban Economics, 2014, 79, 121-138

We study spatial changes in labour market inequality for US states and MSAs using Census and American Community Survey data between 1980 and 2010. We report evidence of significant spatial variations in education employment shares and in the college wage premium for US states and MSAs, and show that the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6582
published in: German Economic Review (Special Issue on Economics of Crime), 2012, 13, 366-84

We present new evidence on the causal impact of education on crime, by considering a large expansion of the UK post-compulsory education system that occurred in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The education expansion raised education levels across the whole education distribution and, in particular for our analysis, at...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6581
published in: Fiscal Studies, 2012, 33 (2), 265 - 286

In this paper, we discuss the quest for more and more education and its implications for social mobility. We document very rapid educational upgrading in Britain over the last thirty years or so and show that this rise has featured faster increases in education acquisition by people from relatively rich...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6205
published in: Journal of Regional Science, 2013, 53 (1), 118–141

There is conflicting evidence on the consequences of immigrant neighbourhood segregation for individual outcomes, with various studies finding positive, negative or insubstantial effects. In this paper, we document the evolution of immigrant segregation in England over the last 40 years. We show that standard measures of segregation point to gentle...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5981
published as 'The Rising Postgraduate Wage Premium' in: Economica, 2016, 83, 281-306

This paper considers what has hitherto been a relatively neglected subject in the wage inequality literature, albeit one that has been becoming more important over time, namely the role played by increases in postgraduate education. We document increases in the number of workers with a postgraduate qualification in the United...

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