Andreas is Director of the ifo Center for Business Cycle Analysis and Surveys and Professor of Economics at the University of Munich. From 20013-2017 he was Head of the Research Group "International Distribution and Redistribution" at ZEW Mannheim and Professor of Public Economics at the University of Mannheim. From 2008--2013 he was a Senior Research Associate and Deputy Program Director for the research area "Future of Labor" (since 2009) at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn, Germany. He is also a Research Associate at the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER), University of Essex, UK (since 06/2008) and a Research Affiliate at Center for Economic Studies (CESifo) of the University of Munich, Germany (since 01/2010).

Andreas has been involved in various research projects conducted on behalf of national ministries, the European Commission, the European Parliament, the European Central Bank and the OECD. His research focuses on empirical public and labor economics. His current research interests include (empirical) public economics, labor economics and welfare economics with particular reference to optimal taxation, tax reforms and their empirical evaluation, tax benefit microsimulation and the analysis of income distributions. His research has been published in various academic journals.

Andreas received his PhD (summa cum laude) for his thesis on "Could the World be Flat? Simulating Flat Tax Reforms in Western Europe" from the University of Cologne (Prof. Dr. C. Fuest) in May 2008. From January 2005 until August 2008 he was PhD student at the University of Cologne and worked as a research assistant at the Cologne Center for Public Economics (CPE). In Spring 2008 he was a visiting scholar at the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex, UK. Prior to his doctoral studies, he studied economics at the Philips-University of Marburg and the University of Cologne and graduated in December 2004 (Diplom-Volkswirt, equiv. M.A. Economics).

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11033

Welfare programs are important for reducing poverty but create incentives for recipients to maximize their income by either reducing labor supply or manipulating taxable income. In this paper, we quantify the extent of such behavioral responses for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) in the US. We exploit that US...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9840

In recent years considerable interest has developed in going 'beyond GDP' to develop measures of economic progress which are more explicitly based on human wellbeing. This work has been inspired, in part, by Sen's non-utilitarian approach to welfare economics, but has been constrained by a lack of empirical indicators relating...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9606
revised version forthcoming in: American Economic Review

This paper estimates the incidence of corporate taxes on wages using a 20-year panel of German municipalities. Administrative linked employer-employee data allows estimating heterogeneous worker and firm effects. We set up a general theoretical framework showing that corporate taxes can have a negative effect on wages in various labor market...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9605
Paul Hufe, Andreas Peichl

The consistent underestimation of inequality of opportunity has led some scholars to call into question the usefulness of such estimates. In this paper we argue that neglecting heterogeneity in the influence of circumstances across types as well as neglecting heterogeneity in type-specific effort distributions are two important sources of the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9139

This paper applies multidimensional affluence measures to a new dataset on income and wealth in 15 Eurozone countries. We start our analysis by examining the income and wealth distributions separately for each country, and extend it to a multidimensional setting by considering the joint distribution of income and wealth. The...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8598
revised version forthcoming in: International Tax and Public Finance

We analyze different alternatives how a common unemployment insurance system for the euro area (EA) could be designed and assess their effectiveness to act as an insurance device in the presence of asymmetric macroeconomic shocks. Running counterfactual simulations based on micro data for the period 2000-13, we highlight and quantify...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8554
revised version forthcoming in: Journal of Public Economics

The elasticity of taxable income (ETI) is often interpreted as a sufficient statistic to assess the welfare costs of taxation. Building on the conceptual framework of Chetty (2009), we show that this assertion does no longer hold for tax systems with deduction possibilities if (i) deductions generate externalities and (ii)...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8553

This paper describes IZAΨMOD, the policy microsimulation model of the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). The model uses household microdata from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study and firm data from the German linked employer-employee dataset LIAB. IZAΨMOD consists of three components: First, a static module simulates the effects...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8281

There is still considerable dispute about the magnitude of labor supply elasticities. While differences in micro and macro estimates are recently attributed to frictions and adjustment costs, we show that relatively low labor supply elasticities derived from microeconometric models can also be explained by modeling assumptions with respect to wages....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7958
revised version published in: European Economic Review, 2015, 80, 94-119

Firms' labor demand responses to wage changes are of key interest in empirical research and policy analysis. However, despite extensive research, estimates of labor demand elasticities remain subject to considerable heterogeneity. In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive meta-regression analysis to re-assess the empirical literature on labor demand elasticities. Building...

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