Nicolas Ziebarth is a tenured Associate Professor in the Department for Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University. Before coming to Cornell, Nicolas worked as a research associate at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin). He earned his PhD in economics from the Berlin University of Technology (TU Berlin) in 2011. His PhD thesis is titled "Sickness Absence and Economic Incentives" and was supervised by Professor Gert G. Wagner. It has been awarded the Upjohn Institute Dissertation Award 2011.

Nicolas Ziebarth's research is in the field of applied health and labor economics. In particular, he analyzes the interaction of social security systems with labor markets and population health. Another focus of his work is the driving forces and implications of health-related behavior.

Nicolas Ziebarth's work has been published in economic journals such as the Journal of Public Economics, the Journal of Health Economics, the Journal of Human Resources, the Journal of Applied Econometrics, and The Economic Journal, but also in multidisciplinary and policy journals such as Health Policy, Health Services Research or Social Science & Medicine .

Nicolas Ziebarth joined IZA as a Research Fellow in March 2011.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10918
Short version forthcoming as a book chapter in: Baltagi, B. H. and Moscone, F. [Eds.] (2017): Health Econometrics in Contributions to Economic Analysis, Emerald Publishing, 1st Edition.

This chapter reviews the existing empirical evidence on how social insurance affects health. Social insurance encompasses programs primarily designed to insure against health risks, such as health insurance, sick leave insurance, accident insurance, long-term care insurance and disability insurance; and programs that insure against other risks, such as unemployment insurance,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10870

To equalize differences in health plan premiums due to differences in risk pools, the German legislature introduced a simple Risk Adjustment Scheme (RAS) based on age, gender and disability status in 1994. In addition, effective 1996, consumers gained the freedom to choose among hundreds of existing health plans, across employers...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9900
Lauren E. Jones, Nicolas R. Ziebarth

This paper assesses the effectiveness of child safety seat laws. These laws progressively increased the mandatory age up to which children must be restrained in safety seats in cars. We use US Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) data from 1978 to 2011 and rich state-time level variation in the implementation...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9867

This paper exploits temporal and spatial variation in the implementation of US sick pay mandates to assess their labor market consequences. We use the Synthetic Control Group Method (SCGM) and the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) to estimate the causal effect of mandated sick leave on employment and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9709
Philip Susser, Nicolas R. Ziebarth

This paper profiles the sick leave landscape in the US – the only industrialized country without universal access to paid sick leave or other forms of paid leave. We exploit the 2011 Leave Supplement of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), a representative and comprehensive database on sick leave in...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9186

Although industrialized nations have long provided public protection to working-age individuals with disabilities, the form has changed over time. The impetus for change has been multi-faceted: rapid growth in program costs; greater awareness that people with impairments are able and willing to work; and increased recognition that protecting the economic...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9088
revised version [Available Here]

This paper comprehensively studies the health effects of Daylight Saving Time (DST) regulation. Relying on up to 3.4 million BRFSS respondents from the US and the universe of 160 million hospital admissions from Germany over one decade, we do not find much evidence that population health significantly decreases when clocks...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8967
published as: "Non-Separable Time Preferences, Novelty Consumption, and Body Weight: Theory and Evidence from the East German Transition to Capitalism," Journal of Health Economics, 2017, 51: 41-65.

This paper develops a conceptual framework that can explain why economic development goes along with increases in body weight and obesity rates. We first introduce the concept of novelty consumption, which refers to an increase in food availability due to trade or innovation. Then we study how novel food products...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8907
published as: "Taxing Consumption and the Take-Up of Public Assistance: The Case of Cigarette Taxes and Food Stamps," Journal of Law & Economics, 2017, 60(1):1-27.

This paper investigates a previously unexplored behavioral response to taxation: whether smokers compensate for higher cigarette taxes by enrolling in food stamps. First, we show theoretically that increases in cigarette taxes can induce food stamp take-up of non-enrolled, eligible smoking households. Then, we study the theoretical predictions empirically by exploiting...

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