Peter Haan

Research Fellow

DIW Berlin

Peter Haan is a Professor of Public Economics at Freie Universität Berlin and Head of department of Public Economics at DIW Berlin.

He received his Ph.D in Economics at the Freie Universität in Berlin. In his research he mainly focusses on social security, taxation and social policy. Recent articles have been published in the Journal of Econometrics, the Economic Journal, Journal of Health Economics and Econometrics Journal.

Peter was an IZA Research Fellow from 2008 until 2011 and rejoined in November 2016.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 11275

In this paper, we study how the tax-and-transfer system reduces the inequality of lifetime income by redistributing lifetime earnings between individuals with different skill endowments and by providing individuals with insurance against lifetime earnings risk. Based on a dynamic life-cycle model, we find that redistribution through the tax-and -transfer system...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11121

This study uses German social security records to provide novel evidence about the heterogeneity in life expectancy by lifetime earnings and, additionally, documents the distributional implications of this earnings-related heterogeneity. We find a strong association between lifetime earnings and life expectancy at age 65 and show that the longevity gap...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8980

We analyze empirically the optimal design of social insurance and assistance programs when families obtain insurance by making labor supply choices for both spouses. For this purpose, we specify a structural life-cycle model of the labor supply and savings decisions of singles and married couples. Partial insurance against wage and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6544
published in: Empirical Economics, 2015, 49, 1123-1141

Dynamic discrete choice models usually require a general specification of unobserved heterogeneity. In this paper, we apply Bayesian procedures as a numerical tool for the estimation of a female labor supply model based on a sample size which is typical for common household panels. We provide two important results for...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5858
published in: Journal of Econometrics, 2014, 178 (3), 582-601

How can public pension systems be reformed to ensure fiscal stability in the face of increasing life expectancy? To address this pressing open question in public finance, we estimate a life-cycle model in which the optimal employment, retirement and consumption decisions of forward-looking individuals depend, inter alia, on life expectancy...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5301

The aim of this paper is to apply recently proposed individual welfare measures in the context of random utility models of labour supply. Contrary to the standard practice of using reference preferences and wages, these measures preserve preference heterogeneity in the normative step of the analysis. They also make the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4792

In this paper we use a dynamic structural life-cycle model to analyze the employment, fiscal and welfare effects induced by unemployment insurance. The model features a detailed specification of the tax and transfer system, including unemployment insurance benefits which depend on an individual's employment and earnings history. The model also...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4503
published in: Labour Economics, 2011, 18 (4), 498-512

In this paper we develop a structural model of female employment and fertility which accounts for intertemporal feedback effects between the two outcomes. We identify the effect of financial incentives on the employment and fertility decision by exploiting variation in the tax and transfer system which differs by employment state...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4154
revised version published as 'Dynamics of Health and Labour Market Risks' in: Journal of Health Economics, 2009, 28 (6), 1116-1125

While there is little doubt that the probability of poor health increases with age, and that less healthy people face a more difficult situation on the labour market, the precise relationship between facing the risks of health deterioration and labour market instability is not well understood. Using twelve years of...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4102
published in: Econometrics Journal, 2010, 13 (3), S99 - S125

We estimate a dynamic structural life-cycle model of employment, non-employment and retirement that includes endogenous accumulation of human capital and intertemporal non-separabilities in preferences. Additionally, the model accounts for the effect of the tax and transfer system on work incentives. The structural parameter estimates are used to evaluate the effects...