Paola Giuliano is an Associate Professor of Economics in the Global Economics and Management Group at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. She serves as a Co-editor of the Journal of European Economic Association. She is also Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge) and Research Affiliate at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (London).

Her main areas of research are culture and economics and political economy. She holds a B.A. from Bocconi University (Milan) and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley. She received the Young Economic Award from the European Economic Association in 2004. Her research has been covered by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Forbes, Foreign Affairs, Businessweek, Time, The Economist, The Guardian, The Financial Times, The Boston Globe, CNBC, KPCC and PBS.

She joined IZA as a Research Fellow in February 2006.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 10931

Social attitudes toward women vary significantly across societies. This chapter reviews recent empirical research on various historical determinants of contemporary differences in gender roles and gender gaps across societies, and how these differences are transmitted from parents to children and therefore persist until today. We review work on the historical...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10930

When does culture persist and when does it change? We examine a determinant that has been put forth in the anthropology literature: the variability of the environment from one generation to the next. A prediction, which emerges from a class of existing models from evolutionary anthropology, is that following the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10147

We use remarkable population-level administrative education and birth records from Florida to study the role of Long-Term Orientation on the educational attainment of immigrant students living in the US. Controlling for the quality of schools and individual characteristics, students from countries with long term oriented attitudes perform better than students...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9246
published in: Journal of Economic Literature, December 2015, 53 (4) 898-944.

A growing body of empirical work measuring different types of cultural traits has shown that culture matters for a variety of economic outcomes. This paper focuses on one specific aspect of the relevance of culture: its relationship to institutions. We review work with a theoretical, empirical, and historical bent to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7376
published in Philippe Aghion and Steven Durlauf (eds.), Handbook of Economic Growth, Vol. 2A, The Netherlands: North Holland, pp. 177-215, 2014

We study the role of the most primitive institution in society: the family. Its organization and relationship between generations shape values formation, economic outcomes and influences national institutions. We use a measure of family ties, constructed from the World Values Survey, to review and extend the literature on the effect...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7156
published in: American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings, 2013, 103 (3), 86-92

We provide evidence that a history of democracy at the local level is associated with contemporary democracy at the national level. Auxiliary estimates show that a tradition of local democracy is also associated with attitudes that favor democracy, with better quality institutions, and higher level of economic development.

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6961
forthcoming in the Economic Journal

When we take a cab we may feel cheated if the driver takes an unnecessarily long route despite the lack of a contract or promise to take the shortest possible path. Is our decision to take the cab affected by our belief that we may end up feeling cheated? Is...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6916
published in International Economic Review, August 2015, 56 (3), 889-915

Trust beliefs are heterogeneous across individuals and, at the same time, persistent across generations. We investigate one mechanism yielding these dual patterns: false consensus. In the context of a trust game experiment, we show that individuals extrapolate from their own type when forming trust beliefs about the same pool of...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5735
published in: The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2013, 128 (2), 469-530

This paper seeks to better understand the historical origins of current differences in norms and beliefs about the appropriate role of women in society. We test the hypothesis that traditional agricultural practices influenced the historical gender division of labor and the evolution and persistence of gender norms. We find that,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5502
published in: American Economic Review, 2011, 101 (3), 499-503

The current study finds that societies which historically engaged in plough agriculture today have lower fertility. We argue, and provide ethnographic evidence, that the finding is explained by the fact that with plough agriculture, children, like women, are relatively less useful in the field. The plough requires strength and eliminates...