Thomas Siedler is Professor in Economics, in particular Microeconometrics at the University of Hamburg. He is a core member of the Hamburg Center for Health Economics (hche) and Research Associate at the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER), University of Essex. Thomas received his PhD in Economics at the University of Essex (UK) in 2007. His general research interests are labour economics, health economics, family economics and intergenerational mobility.

Thomas published in the Economic Journal, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Health Economics, Demography, Economics Letters, Economica, Labour Economics, Journal of Comparative Economics, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A, Behavior Genetics, Economics of Transition, Journal of Population Economics, Population and Development Review, Health Economics and Scandinavian Journal of Economics.

He joined IZA as a Research Affiliate in October 2005 and became a Research Fellow in May 2008.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9356
forthcoming in: Scandinavian Journal of Economics

This study analyzes the importance of parental socialization on the development of children's far right-wing preferences and attitudes towards immigration. Using longitudinal data from Germany, our intergenerational estimates suggest that the strongest and most important predictor for young people's right-wing extremism are parents' right-wing extremist attitudes. While intergenerational associations in...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9042
published in: Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A, 2016, 179 (3), 633–656

Some sociologists argue that non-intact family structures during childhood have a negative effect on adult children's civic engagement, since they undermine, and in some cases prevent, the processes and activities through which parents shape their children's political attitudes and orientations. In this paper, we evaluate this hypothesis on the basis...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8825
published in: Labour Economics, 2015, 34, 39-50

This paper studies the causal effects of graduating from university with an honors degree on subsequent earnings. While a rich body of literature has focused on estimating returns to human capital, few studies have analyzed returns at the very top of the education distribution. We highlight the importance of honors...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8763
published in: Journal of Public Economics, 2015, 123, 55-77

Excessive alcohol consumption among young people is a major public health concern. On March 1, 2010, the German state of Baden-Württemberg banned the sale of alcoholic beverages between 10pm and 5am at off-premise outlets (e.g., gas stations, kiosks, supermarkets). We use rich monthly administrative data from a 70 percent random...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8141

This paper studies the causal effect of student internship experience on labor market choices and wages later in life. We use variation in the introduction and abolishment of mandatory internships at German universities as an instrument for completing an internship while attending university. Employing longitudinal data from graduate surveys, we...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8100

This study examines the causal link between individuals' occupational knowledge, educational choices, and labor market outcomes. We proxy occupational knowledge with mandatory visits to job information centers (JICs) in Germany while still attending school. Exogenous variation in the location and timing of JIC openings allow estimating causal effects in a...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6996

There is a large body of literature analyzing the relationship between objective economic conditions and voting behavior, but there is very little evidence of how perceived economic insecurity impacts on political preferences. Using seventeen years of household panel data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, we examine whether job loss fears...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6981

This paper analyzes the extent to which intergenerational upward and downward mobility in earnings are related to individuals' preferences for redistribution. A novel survey question from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study – whether the taxes paid by unskilled workers are too high, adequate or too low – are used to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4878
revised version published in: Population and Development Review, 2012, 38 (2), 337-351

This paper conducts a cross-national econometric analysis of intra-family location and caregiving patterns. First, we assess, from an international perspective, the relationship between family structure and the geographic proximity between adult children and their parents. We then examine whether differences in family structure affect the amount of informal care adult...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4873
revised version published in: Journal of Health Economics, 2011, 30 (3), 591-601

This paper investigates the short-term effects of public smoking bans on individual smoking behavior. In 2007 and 2008, state-level smoking bans were gradually introduced in all of Germany's sixteen federal states. We exploit this variation in the timing of state bans to identify the effect that smoke-free policies had on...

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