Peter Mueser is Professor of Economics at the University of Missouri, where he has taught since 1985. His research focuses on poverty, welfare, job training programs and migration. His work is published in The Review of Economics and Statistics, The Journal of Regional Science, The American Journal of Political Science, The Journal of Urban Economics, Demography, The Journal of Labor Economics and other social science journals. His book, Welfare and Work: Experiences in Six Cities, coauthored with Christopher King (Upjohn Institute, 2005), examines the employment experiences of welfare recipients during the period of welfare reform.

He has held positions at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business and the Johns Hopkins University. He received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago in 1983.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in February 2005.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10007

This paper provides novel evidence on the labor-market returns to proprietary (also called for-profit) postsecondary school attendance. Specifically, we link administrative records on proprietary school attendance with quarterly earnings data for nearly 70,000 students. Because average age at school entry is 30 years of age, and because we have earnings...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7772

Although many programs redistribute resources in the U.S., two program were central in providing a safety net for those facing hardship during the Great Recession: the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which grew to 47.7 million people in January 2013 – or 15.1 percent of all Americans – and the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6759

Temporary Help Services (THS) employment has been growing in size, particularly among disadvantaged workers, and in importance in balancing cyclical fluctuations in labor demand. Does THS employment provide some benefits to disadvantaged workers, or divert them from better jobs? We investigate whether THS jobs pay a compensating differential, as would...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6758
revision published in: Journal of Political Economy, 2016, 124 (3), 621-649

We evaluate the labor-market returns to General Educational Development (GED) certification using state administrative data. We develop a fuzzy regression discontinuity (FRD) method to account for the fact that GED test takers can repeatedly retake the test until they pass it. Our technique can be applied to other situations where...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4569
published as "Do Public Employment and Training Programs Work?" in: IZA Journal of Labor Economics 2013, 2:6

This paper presents nonexperimental net impact estimates for the Adult and Dislocated Worker programs under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), the primary federal job training program in the U.S, based on administrative data from 12 states, covering approximately 160,000 WIA participants and nearly 3 million comparison group members. The key...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3131

State and federal reforms of the 1990s transformed the U.S. cash assistance program for single parents and their children. Despite an extensive literature examining these changes and their impacts, there have been few studies that consider the effects of these reforms from the perspective of the recent period. The analysis...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1520

Studies examining the effectiveness of welfare-to-work programs present findings that are mixed and sometimes at odds, in part due to research design, data, and methodological limitations of the studies. We aim to substantially improve on past approaches to estimate program effectiveness by using administrative data on welfare recipients in Missouri...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 786
Peter R. Mueser, Kenneth Troske, Alexey Gorislavsky

This paper uses administrative data from Missouri to examine the sensitivity of job training program impact estimates based on alternative nonexperimental methods. In addition to simple regression adjustment, we consider Mahalanobis distance matching and a variety of methods using propensity score matching. In each case, we consider estimates based on...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 584
published in: Review of Economics and Statistics, 2005, 87 (1), 154-173

Recent welfare reforms are prompting some state and local welfare agencies to use temporary help service firms to help place welfare recipients into jobs. Concerns have arisen that these jobs are more likely to pay low wages, provide fewer benefits, and offer less stability. We explore the effects of temporary...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 561

Welfare reform has transformed the U.S. cash assistance program for single parents and their children. Although there remains substantial uncertainty about the importance of reform in producing the subsequent decline in the welfare caseload, even less is known about its impact on the experiences and well being of former welfare...

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