Ana Rute Cardoso

Research Fellow

IAE Barcelona (CSIC)

Ana Rute Cardoso received her Ph.D. in economics in 1997 at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. She completed her first degree in economics and her Masters at the Lisbon Technical University. Ana's research interests include earnings dispersion, employer behavior, and the impact of labor market institutions and regulations. Her work appeared in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, Journal of Labor Economics, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, among others.

She is an Associate Research Professor at IAE (CSIC) in Barcelona, the Institute for Economic Analysis of the Spanish National Research Council, and Affiliated Professor at the Barcelona Graduate School of Economics. From 2002 to 2008 she worked at IZA as a Research Associate and before she was Associate Professor at the University of Minho in Portugal.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11419

We bring together the strands of literature on the returns to education, its spillovers, and the role of the employer shaping the wage distribution. The aim is to analyze the labor market returns to education taking into account who the worker is (worker unobserved ability), what he does (the job...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9850
forthcoming in: Journal of Labor Economics

We review the literature on firm-level drivers of labor market inequality. There is strong evidence from a variety of fields that standard measures of productivity – like output per worker or total factor productivity – vary substantially across firms, even within narrowly-defined industries. Several recent studies note that rising trends...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9070
Ana Rute Cardoso, Annalisa Loviglio, Lavinia Piemontese
published as 'Misperceptions of unemployment and individual labor market outcomes' in: IZA Journal of Labor Policy, 2016, 5 (13)

We analyze the impact of information frictions on workers' wages, contributing to the literature that tested search theory, which has so far focused on labor market frictions in general and not specifically on information asymmetries. Using data for 16 countries from the European Social Survey 2008, we find a sizeable...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7592
published as 'Bargaining, sorting, and the gender wage gap: Quantifying the impact of firms on the relative pay of women' in: Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2016, 131 (2), 633-686 [Online First]

An influential recent literature argues that women are less likely to initiate bargaining with their employers and are (often) less effective negotiators than men. We use longitudinal wage data from Portugal, matched to balance sheet information on employers, to measure the relative bargaining power of men and women and assess...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7109
published as 'What drives the gender wage gap? A look at the role of firm and job-title heterogeneity' in: Oxford Economic Papers, 2016, 68 (2), 506-524

Earlier literature on the gender pay gap has taught us that occupations matter and so do firms. However, the role of the firm has received little scrutiny; occupations have most often been coded in a rather aggregate way, lumping together different jobs; and the use of samples of workers prevents...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5915
published in: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2012, 4 (4), 57-93

Although the practice of military conscription was widespread during most of the past century, credible evidence on the effects of mandatory service is limited. Angrist (1990) showed that the Vietnam-era draft in the U.S. lowered the early-career wages of conscripts, a finding he attributed to the low value of military...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5121
published in: De Economist, 2011, 159 (2), 95-111

Using longitudinal employer-employee data spanning over a 22-year period, we compare age-wage and age-productivity profiles and find that productivity increases until the age range of 50-54, whereas wages peak around the age 40-44. At younger ages, wages increase in line with productivity gains but as prime-age approaches, wage increases lag...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4785
published in: Kyklos, 2010, 63 (4), 479-494; cited in The Economist, February 2011

Given the recent efforts in several countries to reorganize the research institutional setting to improve research productivity, our analysis addresses the following questions: To which extent has the recent awareness over international quality standards in economics around the world been reflected in research performance? How have individual countries fared? Do...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4236

This paper quantifies the long-run impact of exposure to youth minimum wages and sheds light on its mechanisms. It uses remarkable longitudinal data spanning for twenty years and explores legislative changes that define groups of teenagers exposed for different durations. After controlling for the contemporaneous impact of the minimum wage,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3898
published in: Scientometrics, 2010, 84 (3), 621-637

This paper analyzes the early research performance of PhD graduates in labor economics, addressing the following questions: Are there major productivity differences between graduates from American and European institutions? If so, how relevant is the quality of the training received (i.e. ranking of institution and supervisor) and the research environment...

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