Joan Monras joined CEMFI in September 2016 as an assistant professor of Economics. Prior to that he was an assistant professor of economics at Sciences Po affiliated with the Economics Department and LIEPP. He did his PhD in Economics at Columbia University.

His research interests include labor economics, urban economics, and international trade. He holds a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Barcelona, a MSc in History and Theory of International Relations from the London School of Economics and a MA in Economics from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra.


He joined IZA as a Research Affiliate in January 2014.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11075

This paper investigates the causes and effects of the spatial distribution of immigrants across US cities. We document that: a) immigrants concentrate in large, high-wage, and expensive cities, b) the earnings gap between immigrants and natives is higher in larger and more expensive cities, and c) immigrants consume less locally...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10687

This paper investigates the consequences of the legalization of around 600,000 immigrants by the unexpectedly elected Spanish government of Zapatero following the terrorist attacks of March 2004 (Garcia-Montalvo (2011)). Using detailed data from payroll-tax revenues, we estimate that each newly legalized immigrant increased social-security revenues by 3,504 Euros on average....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10212

The continuing inflow of hundreds of thousands of refugees into many European countries has ignited much political controversy and raised questions that require a fuller understanding of the determinants and consequences of refugee supply shocks. This paper revisits four historical refugee shocks to document their labor market impact. Specifically, we...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9460

Often, minimum wage laws are decided at the state or regional level, and even when not, federal level increases are only binding in certain states. This has been used in previous literature to evaluate the effects of minimum wages on earnings and employment levels. This paper introduces a spatial equilibrium...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8924

How does the US labor market absorb low-skilled immigration? I address this question using the 1995 Mexican Peso Crisis, an exogenous push factor that raised Mexican migration to the US. In the short run, high-immigration states see their low-skilled labor force increase and native low-skilled wages decrease, with an implied...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8840

Previous literature shows that internal migration rates are strongly procyclical. This would seem to imply that geographic relocation does not help mitigate negative local economic shocks during recessions. This paper shows that this is not the case. I document that net in-migration rates decreased in areas more affected by the...

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