Georg is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Uppsala University. He obtained his PhD in Economics in 2014 and a BSc in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics in 2009, both from the LSE. Georg's research interests include technological change, earnings inequality, and the economics of education. He joined IZA as a Research Affiliate in January 2014.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11125

Several recent papers employ the regression discontinuity design (RDD) to estimate the causal effect of a diploma (or similar credentials) on wages. Using a simple model of asymmetric information, I show that RDD estimates the information value of a diploma. A positive information value arises if employers, unable to observe...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10470

Since the early 1990s, recoveries from recessions in the US have been plagued by weak employment growth. One possible explanation for these "jobless" recoveries is rooted in technological change: middle-skill jobs, often involving routine tasks, are lost during recessions, and the displaced workers take time to transition into other jobs...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8938

Despite ubiquitous discussions of robots' potential impact, there is almost no systematic empirical evidence on their economic effects. In this paper we analyze for the first time the economic impact of industrial robots, using new data on a panel of industries in 17 countries from 1993-2007. We find that industrial...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8836
Andy Feng, Georg Graetz

How do firms respond to technological advances that facilitate the automation of tasks? Which tasks will they automate, and what types of worker will be replaced as a result? We present a model that distinguishes between a task's engineering complexity and its training requirements. When two tasks are equally complex,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8826
Andy Feng, Georg Graetz

How does measured performance at university affect labor market outcomes? We show that degree class – a coarse measure of student performance used in the UK – causally affects graduates' industry and hence expected wages. To control for unobserved ability, we employ a regression discontinuity design that utilizes rules governing...

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