Dan-Olof Rooth completed his doctorate in Economics at Lund University in Sweden in 1999 with his thesis on “Refugee Immigrants in Sweden”. Then he became employed at the Department of Economics at Linneaus University (previously Kalmar), Sweden. In 2009 he became professor. Since January 2016 he is a professor at the Institute of social research (SOFI) at Stockholm University. Dan-Olof has published in journals such as the American Economic Review, Review of Economics and Statistics, AEJ-Applied, Journal of Human Resources, Economic Journal, Journal of Population Economics, Economic Letters and Labour Economics. His current research interests include issues in Economic Psychology, Political Economy, Ethnic Discrimination and Health Economics as well as more general research on labor market opportunities of immigrants.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in August 2006.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 11323

We examine whether exposure of men to women in a traditionally male-dominated environment can change attitudes about mixed-gender productivity, gender roles and gender identity. Our context is the military in Norway, where we randomly assigned female recruits to some squads but not others during boot camp. We find that living...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11285
published in: Applied Economics, 2018, 50(24), 2652–2663

Several studies using observational data suggest that ethnic discrimination increases in downturns of the economy. We investigate whether ethnic discrimination depends on labor market tightness using data from correspondence studies. We utilize three correspondence studies of the Swedish labor market and two different measures of labor market tightness. These two...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11284
Magnus Carlsson, Abdulaziz Abrar Reshid, Dan-Olof Rooth
forthcoming in: International Journal of Manpower

The question of whether and how living in a deprived neighborhood affects the labor market outcomes of its residents has been a subject of great interest for both policy makers and researchers. Despite this interest, empirical evidence of causal neighborhood effects on labor market outcomes is scant, and causal evidence...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11234
Jesper Alex-Petersen, Petter Lundborg, Dan-Olof Rooth

We examine the long-term impact of a policy that introduced free and nutritious school lunches in Swedish primary schools. For this purpose, we use historical data on the gradual implementation of the policy across municipalities and employ a difference-in-differences design to estimate the impact of this lunch policy on a...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10349

A large theoretical and empirical literature explores whether politicians and political parties change their policy positions in response to voters' preferences. This paper asks the opposite question: do political parties affect public attitudes on important policy issues? Problems of reverse causality and omitted variable bias make this a difficult question...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9175
published in: Journal of Human Resources, 2018, 53(1), 189-231

We study the effect of birth weight on long-run outcomes, including permanent income, income across various stages of the lifecycle, education, social benefits take-up, and adult mortality. For this purpose, we have linked a unique dataset on nearly all Swedish twins born between 1926-1958, containing information on birth weight, to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9174

This paper shows that health is an important determinant of labor market vulnerability during large economic crises. Using data on adults during Sweden's unexpected economic crisis in the early 1990s, we show that early and later life health are important determinants of job loss after the crisis, but not before....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7619
revised version published in: IZA Journal of Migration 2014, 3:11

The advocates of correspondence testing (CT) argue that it provide the most clear and convincing evidence of discrimination. The common view is that the standard CT can identify what is typically defined as discrimination in a legal sense – what we label total discrimination in the current study –, although...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6913
published in: Review of Economics and Statistics, 2015, 97 (3), 533–547

How schooling affects cognitive skills is a fundamental question for studies of human capital and labor markets. While scores on cognitive ability tests are positively associated with schooling, it has proven difficult to ascertain whether this relationship is causal. Moreover, the effect of schooling is difficult to separate from the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6570
published in: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2014, 6 (1), 253-278

In this paper, we exploit the Swedish compulsory schooling reform in order to estimate the causal effect of parental education on son's outcomes. We use data from the Swedish enlistment register on the entire population of males and focus on outcomes such as cognitive skills, non-cognitive skills, and various dimensions...