Pedro Silva Martins is Professor of Applied Economics at Queen Mary, University of London, and Research Fellow of NovaSBE (Lisbon).

He was Secretary of State for Employment in the Government of Portugal from 2011 until 2013. During this period, he was responsible for reforms in areas such as employment protection legislation, active labour market policies, the public employment service, apprenticeships, the European Social Fund, and tripartite dialogue.

In 2016, he was a member of the group of experts advising the Government of Greece and the European Commission on labour market reforms.

He holds a PhD from the University of Warwick and a degree from Nova Lisbon, both in economics.

Pedro Martins' academic research has focused on the roles of schooling, business cycles and globalisation on the wage distribution; and the effects of institutions, in particular employment protection, upon different worker and firm outcomes. Current interests also include employment services and collective bargaining.

His research is published in the Journal of Labor Economics, American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, European Economic Review, Journal of the European Economic Association, Labour Economics, Journal of Population Economics, British Journal of Industrial Relations, Economics Letters and other journals and edited volumes.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in October 2004.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11305
Judite Goncalves, Pedro S. Martins

The growth of novel flexible work formats raises a number of questions about their effects upon health and the potential required changes in public policy. However, answering these questions is hampered by lack of suitable data. This is the first paper that draws on comprehensive longitudinal administrative data to examine...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11113
Alexander Hijzen, Pedro S. Martins, Jante Parlevliet

This paper contributes to a deeper understanding of sector-level bargaining systems and their role for labour market performance. We compare two countries with seemingly similar collective bargaining systems, the Netherlands and Portugal, and document a number of features that may affect labour market outcomes, including: i) the scope for flexibility...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10950

Non-cognitive skills programs may be an important policy option to improve the academic outcomes of adolescents. In this paper, we evaluate experimentally the EPIS program, which is based on bi-weekly individual or small-group non-cognitive mediation short meetings with low-performing students. Our RCT estimates, covering nearly 3,000 7th and 8th-grade students...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10289

Personnel economics tends be based on single-firm case studies. Here we examine the personnel practices of nearly 5,000 firms, over a period of 20 years, using detailed matched employer-employee panel data from Portugal. In the spirit of Baker et al. (1994a,b), we consider different dimensions of personnel management within each...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10262

In most countries, the unemployed are entitled to unemployment benefits only if they have previously worked a minimum period of time. This institutional feature creates a sharp change at eligibility in the disutility from unemployment and may distort the duration of jobs. In this paper, we evaluate this eligibility effect...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10222

Firms make labour demand decisions not only between permanent and non-permanent employees but also increasingly more between employees and contractors. Indeed, this third work format can be attractive, also when employment protection law is restrictive. This paper examines empirically this scarcely researched trade-off drawing on a recent reform in Portugal...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10206

Fixed-term contracts (FTCs) may be an important tool to promote hirings and employment, particularly in recessions or when permanent contracts are costly. Therefore, it may be useful to let some of the legal parameters of FTCs (as well as those of other labour market institutions) vary systematically over the business...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10205

In 2012, in the midst of a recession, a labour law reform in Portugal allowed firms to reduce the overtime premium paid to their workers by 50% or more. Until then, overtime premiums were set by law at a relatively high level and could not be cut unilaterally. We analyse...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10204

In many countries, notably across Europe, collective bargaining coverage is enhanced by government-issued extensions that widen the reach of collective agreements beyond their signatory parties to all firms and workers in the same sector. This paper analyses the causal impact of such extensions on employment using a natural experiment in...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9849
forthcoming in: Journal of Labor Economics

It is well known that, unless worker-firm match quality is controlled for, returns to firm tenure (RTT) estimated directly via reduced form wage (Mincer) equations will be biased. In this paper we argue that even if match quality is properly controlled for there is a further pervasive source of bias,...

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