Alan Barreca joined UCLA as an Associate Professor in 2017. Before that, he worked at Tulane University in New Orleans. Alan earned a PhD in Economics from UC Davis in 2008 and has published articles on a range of issues relating to human health and our environment since then.

Alan mainly investigates the reasons why people living in certain climates have more economic advantages and better health than others. His ongoing research has helped identify ways we can mitigate both the costs of weather shocks today and the future costs of climate change.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in April 2013.

Filter

Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9480

Dynamic adjustments could be a useful strategy for mitigating the costs of acute environmental shocks when timing is not a strictly binding constraint. To investigate whether such adjustments could apply to fertility, we estimate the effects of temperature shocks on birth rates in the United States between 1931 and 2010....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8915

A critical part of adapting to the higher temperatures that climate change brings will be the deployment of existing technologies to new sectors and regions. This paper examines the evolution of the temperature-mortality relationship over the course of the entire 20th century in the United States both for its own...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7987

Air pollution was severe in many urban areas of the United States in the first half of the twentieth century, in part due to the burning of bituminous coal for heat. We estimate the effects of this bituminous coal consumption on mortality rates in the U.S. during the mid-20th century....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5106

Throughout the years spanned by the U.S. Vital Statistics Linked Birth and Infant Death Data (1983-2002), birth weights are measured most precisely for children of white and highly educated mothers. As a result, less healthy children, who are more likely to be of low socioeconomic status, are disproportionately represented at...

Type
Type