Bas van der Klaauw is professor of economics at the VU University Amsterdam and Research Fellow of the Tinbergen Institute. Furthermore, he is affiliated with the CEPR and IFAU (Uppsala). He obtained his Ph.D. from the VU University Amsterdam in May 2000. His previous affiliations include a visiting position at the Department of Economics of the University of Pennsylvania. Among other things, Bas van der Klaauw has published in Journal of Econometrics, Journal of Business and Economic Statististics, Journal of Public Economics, and Journal of Labor Economics. His current research interests include empirical microeconometrics, labor economics and health economics.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in May 2004.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10531

We test whether different empirical methods give different results when evaluating job-search assistance programs. Budgetary problems at the Dutch unemployment insurance (UI) administration in March 2010, caused a sharp drop in the availability of these programs. Using administrative data provided by the UI administration, we evaluate the effect of the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9786

This paper studies mandatory job-search periods for welfare applicants. During this period the benefits application is put on hold and the applicant is obliged to make job applications. We combine a randomized experiment with detailed administrative data to investigate the effects of imposing a job-search period. We find strong and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9692
published in: Health Economics [Online Access]

We investigate whether interventions by (i) medical doctors and (ii) occupational specialists are effective in reducing sick leave durations among self-employed workers. To this end, we exploit unique administrative data comprising all sick leave claims by self-employed workers insured with the major Dutch private insurer between January 2009 and March...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9118

Theory points to a potential trade-off between two main school assignment mechanisms; Boston and Deferred Acceptance (DA). While DA is strategy-proof and gives a stable matching, Boston might outperform DA in terms of ex-ante efficiency. We quantify the (dis)advantages of the mechanisms by using information about actual choices under Boston...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9074
forthcoming in: Scandinavian Journal of Economics

This paper examines whether children are better off if their parents have stronger social networks. Using data on high-school friendships of parents, we analyze whether the number and characteristics of friends affect the labor-market outcomes of children. While parental friendships formed in high school appear long lasting, we find no...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9038

This paper studies the effects of introducing legal street prostitution zones on both registered and perceived crime. We exploit a unique setting in the Netherlands where legal street prostitution zones were opened in nine cities under different regulation systems. We provide evidence that the opening of these zones was not...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8336

This paper exploits a substantial reform of the Dutch UI law to study the effect of the entitlement period on job finding and subsequent labor market outcomes. Using detailed administrative data covering the full population we find that reducing the entitlement period increases the job finding rate, but decreases the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8047
published in: Labour Economics, 2014, 30, 88-97

This overview describes the development of methods for empirical research in the field of labor economics during the past four decades. This period is characterized by the use of micro data to answer policy relevant research question. Prominent in the literature is the search for exogenous variation in treatment assignment...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7951
forthcoming as 'Tuition Fees and Sunk-Cost Effects' in: Economic Journal

This paper reports on a field experiment testing for sunk-cost effects in an education setting. Students signing up for extra-curricular tutorial sessions randomly received a discount on the tuition fee. The sunk-cost effect predicts that students who receive larger discounts will attend fewer tutorial sessions. For the full sample, we...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7740

We structurally estimate a novel job search model with endogenous job search effort, job quality dispersion, and effort monitoring, taking into account that monitoring effects may be mitigated by on-the-job search and search channel substitution. The data are from a randomized experiment conducted in the Netherlands. They include registers of...

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