Mark Wooden commenced an appointment as a Professorial Fellow with the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research in March 2000. He was previously Professor and Acting Director at the National Institute of Labour Studies, Flinders University of South Australia, where he had been employed for 19 years. In that time he developed a reputation as one of Australia's leading commentators on contemporary developments in the labour market.

In 2000 he, under contract with the Australian Government, established the HILDA Survey Project, Australia's first large-scale household panel survey, and still manages this project today. He thus has a strong interest in the analysis of longitudinal data to investigate contemporary social and economic issues.

Professor Wooden's other current research interests are primarily in the areas of the changing nature of work, and especially working time arrangements, and employee relations and economic performance. However, he has also undertaken research in other related fields, including immigration, education and training, human resource management, public health and subjective well-being.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in October 2001.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10768

The debate over whether contingent (and typically more precarious) employment acts as a bridge to permanent employment, or as a trap, has tended to focus on transitions rather than longer-run pathways. This approach cannot accurately identify indirect pathways from contingent to permanent employment, and nor can it identify 'trap' pathways...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10670

This study uses panel data for Australia from the HILDA Survey to estimate the wage differential between workers in temporary jobs and workers in permanent jobs. Specifically, unconditional quantile regression methods with fixed effects are used to examine how this gap varies over the entire wages distribution. While fixed-term contract...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9879
Published in: Labour Economics, 2017, 46, 150-165. doi:10.1016/j.labeco.2017.05.001

Much of the economic cost of mental illness stems from workers' reduced productivity. We analyze the links between mental health and two alternative workplace productivity measures – absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e., lower productivity while attending work) – explicitly allowing these relationships to be moderated by the nature of the job...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9818

Nationally representative panel survey data for Germany and Australia are used to investigate the impact of working-time mismatches (i.e., differences between actual and desired work hours) on mental health, as measured by the Mental Component Summary Score from the SF-12. Fixed effects and dynamic linear models are estimated, which, together...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8935
Published in: Southern Economic Journal, 2016, 83(4), 903-931. doi:10.1002/soej.12181

Using newly collected data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey, this study presents new estimates of the earnings effects of sexual orientation in Australia and offers the first empirical investigation of the labour market trajectories of lesbian/gay/bisexual individuals. Our results show that gay males are:...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8793
Forthcoming in European Economic Review, 2017. doi:10.1016/j.euroecorev.2016.12.012

We use longitudinal data describing couples in Australia from 2001-12 and Germany from 2002-12 to examine how demographic events affect perceived time and financial stress. Consistent with the view of measures of stress as proxies for the Lagrangean multipliers in models of household production, we show that births increase time...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8588
Published in: IZA Journal of Labor Economics, 2017, 6:6. doi:10.1186/s40172-017-0056-1

This study examines the impact of involuntary job loss on the mental health of family members. Estimates from fixed-effects panel data models, using panel data for Australia, provide little evidence of any negative spillover effect on the mental health of husbands as a result of their wives' job loss. The...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8127
Substantially revised version published as: 'Life Satisfaction and Sexual Minorities: Evidence from Australia and the United Kingdom', Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 2015, 116, 107-126. doi:10.1016/j.jebo.2015.04.012

Very little is known about how the differential treatment of sexual minorities could influence subjective reports of overall well-being. This paper seeks to fill this gap. Data from two large surveys that provide nationally representative samples for two different countries – Australia (the HILDA Survey) and the UK (the UK...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7590
Published in: Industrial Relations, 2015, 54(2), 256-275. doi:10.1111/irel.12090

It is widely assumed that contingent forms of employment, such as fixed-term contracts, labour-hire and casual employment, are associated with low quality jobs. This hypothesis is tested using data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey, a nationally representative household panel survey covering a country with...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7365
Substantially revised version published as: 'What’s the good of education on our overall quality of life? A simultaneous equation model of education and life satisfaction for Australia', Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, 2015, 54(1), 10-21. doi:10.1016/j.socec.2014.11.002

Many economists and educators favour public support for education on the premise that education improves the overall well-being of citizens. However, little is known about the causal pathways through which education shapes people's subjective well-being (SWB). This paper explores the direct and indirect well-being effects of extra schooling induced through...

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