Martin Biewen studied economics at the Ruhr University Bochum and the University of Bonn, where he graduated as Diplom-Volkswirt in 1996. In 2000, he received a PhD in economics at the University of Heidelberg. From 2000 until 2001, he worked as a senior research officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex. In 2005, he received a Habilitation in economics and econometrics at the University of Mannheim in 2005. From 2006 to 2009, Martin Biewen was a professor of statistics at the University of Mainz, and since 2009 he has been a professor of statistics, econometrics and quantitative methods at the University of Tübingen. His research interests include applied microeconometics, income distribution, labor economics, the evaluation of active labour market policies, and education economics. He has published articles in journals such as the Journal of Econometrics, the Journal of Applied Econometrics, The Review of Economics and Statistics, the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, and the Journal of Labor Economics.

Martin Biewen joined IZA as a Research Fellow in August 2001.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11080

This paper employs the dynamic treatment effects methodology proposed by Heckman et al. (2016, 2017) to examine educational transitions and expected returns in the German education system which is characterized by rigid early tracking but with options to revise track choices at later stages. We document strong sorting of individuals...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11072

This study revisits the increase in wage inequality in Germany. Accounting for changes in various sets of observables, composition changes explain a large part of the increase in wage inequality among full-time workers. The composition effects are larger for females than for males, and increasingly heterogenous labor market histories play...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10763

This paper provides a comprehensive assessment of the quantitative importance of the factors associated with the rise in male wage inequality in Germany over the period 1995–2010. In contrast to most previous contributions, we rely on the German Structure of Earnings Surveys (GSES) which allow us to focus on hourly...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10450

We analyze the potential influence of a number of factors on the distribution of equivalized net incomes in Germany over the period 2005/2006 to 2010/11. While income inequality considerably increased in the years before 2005/2006, this trend was stopped after 2005/2006. Among many other factors, we consider the role of...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10050

We analyze individual career transitions of men and women in Germany. Our particular focus is on the association of upward, downward and horizontal job changes with individual fertility. In contrast to most of the literature, we focus on potential rather than realized fertility. Based on mixed multivariate proportional hazard models...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9699
substantially revised version published in: Economics of Education Review, 56, 80-94

We study life-cycle educational transitions in an education system characterized by early tracking and institutionalized branches of academic and vocational training but with the possibility to revise earlier decisions at later stages. Our model covers all major transitions ranging from preschool education through primary and secondary schooling to different forms...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7209

We use income satisfaction data in order to estimate equivalence scales. Our method differs from previous attempts to use satisfaction data for this purpose in that it can be used to estimate or evaluate any given parametric equivalence scale. It can also be employed to investigate specific questions related to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6730
revised version published in: Applied Economics Letters, 2014, 21 (9), 636-642

This paper proposes a comprehensive, path-independent decomposition formula of changes into ceteris paribus effects and interaction effects. The formula implies a reassessment of sequential decomposition methods that are widely used in the literature and that are restrictive in how they treat interaction effects. If counterfactual outcomes are correctly specified, it...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6113
revised version published in: Applied Economics, 2014, 46 (9), 996-1020

We address the long standing question of whether production factors are paid their marginal products. We propose a new approach that circumvents the need to specify production functions and to compare marginal products to factor payments. Our approach is based on a simple equation that directly relates firms' profits to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5062
revised version published in: Review of Income and Wealth, 2012, 58 (4), 622-647

We examine the causes for rising income inequality in Europe’s most populous economy. From 2000 to 2006, Germany experienced an unprecedented rise in net equivalized income inequality and poverty. At the same time, unemployment rose to record levels and there was evidence for a widening distribution of labour market returns,...

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