Steven Stillman is a Professor of Economics at the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano. He is also an affiliated Senior Research Associate at Motu Economic and Public Policy Research Trust and an affiliated Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute and the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Washington in 2000.

Steve’s research focuses on empirical labour economics, specialising in the behaviour of individuals and households. He is broadly interested in research on migration, health, nutrition, education, household decision-making and inequality.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in August 2001.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11392
Diego Zambiasi, Steven Stillman

This paper examines the amenity value of legalized marijuana by analyzing the impact of marijuana legalization on migration to Colorado. Colorado is the pioneering state in this area having legalized medical marijuana in 2000 and recreational marijuana in 2012. We test whether potential migrants to Colorado view legalized marijuana as...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10987

Much has been written about politicians' preferences for electoral systems, yet little is known about the preferences of voters. In 1993, New Zealand had a binding electoral referendum on the same day as the general election where voters chose between keeping a single plurality system (First Past the Post) or...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10975

As in other OECD countries, women in New Zealand earn substantially less than men with similar observable characteristics. In this paper, we use a decade of annual wage and productivity data from New Zealand's Linked Employer-Employee Database to examine different explanations for this gender wage gap. Sorting by gender at...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10954

Obesity rates have risen dramatically in the US since the 1980s, but well-identified studies have struggled to explain the magnitude of the observed changes. In this paper, we estimate the causal impact of economic insecurity on obesity rates. Specifically, we construct a synthetic panel of demographic groups over the period...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10803

Minority groups in many countries, particularly indigenous populations, live in very segregated environments. Many social scientists believe that social networks create poverty traps in these types of segregated environments, with a lack of positive role models reinforcing a lack of good job opportunities. In this paper, we use data from...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10543

This paper exploits the reduction in the legal drinking age in New Zealand from 20 to 18 to study the dynamics of youth risk taking. Using administrative data on the universe of road accidents over a fifteen year period spanning the law change, we undertake three complimentary analyses to examine...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10210

A number of recent papers have found that non-cognitive skills and in particular, locus of control (LoC), are important predictors of success in life in terms of both traditional labor market and socioeconomic outcomes, and measures of subjective wellbeing. Specifically, the literature has found a strong correlation between having an...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10110
John Gibson, David McKenzie, Halahingano Rohorua, Steven Stillman

We study how migration from a poor to a rich country affects key economic beliefs, preference parameters, and transnational household decision-making efficiency. Our setting is the migration of Tongans to New Zealand through a migration lottery program. In a ten-year follow-up survey of individuals applying for this program we elicit...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10063

The impact that an unforeseen event has on household welfare depends on the extent to which household members can take actions to mitigate the direct impact of the shock. In this paper, we use nine years of longitudinal data from the Household Income Labour Dynamics of Australia (HILDA) survey to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9492
John Gibson, David McKenzie, Halahingano Rohorua, Steven Stillman
forthcoming in: World Bank Economic Review

We examine the long-term impacts of international migration by comparing immigrants who had successful ballot entries in a migration lottery program, and first moved almost a decade ago, with people who had unsuccessful entries into those same ballots. The long-term gain in income is found to be similar in magnitude...

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