Gerard J. van den Berg

Research Fellow and Program Coordinator

University of Bristol

Gerard J. van den Berg (1962) is Professor of Economics at the University of Bristol. Previously he was Alexander von Humboldt Professor in Econometrics and Empirical Economics at the University of Mannheim. He has also worked at the VU University Amsterdam, Princeton University, Northwestern University, New York University, Stockholm School of Economics, Tilburg University, Groningen University, and INSEE-CREST.

He was Joint Managing Editor of The Economic Journal and co-editor of the Journal of Econometrics. He has published in Econometrica, Review of Economic Studies, International Economic Review, and other journals.

Gerard J. van den Berg is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and research fellow of IFAU (Uppsala), ZEW (Mannheim), CEPR (London) and, since January 1999, of IZA.

Since July 2004, he has been Program Director of IZA’s research area "Evaluation of Labor Market Programs".

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11447

This paper studies the effects of day care exposure on behavioral disorders and mental and physical health at various ages during childhood. We draw on a unique set of merged population register data from Sweden over the period 1999-2008. This includes merged information at the individual level from the inpatient...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11338

We examine whether economic downturns are beneficial to health outcomes of newborn infants in developed countries. For this we use merged population-wide registers on health and economic and demographic variables, including the national medical birth register and intergenerational link registers from Sweden covering 1992–2004. We take a rigorous econometric approach...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10810

Most of the literature that exploits business cycle variation at birth to study long-run effects of economic conditions on health later in life is based on pre-1940 birth cohorts. They were born in times where social safety nets were largely absent and they grew up in societies with relatively low...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10809

There has been much interest recently in the relationship between economic conditions and mortality, with some studies showing that mortality is pro-cyclical whereas others find the opposite. Some suggest that the aggregation level of analysis (e.g. individual vs. regional) matters. We use both individual and aggregated data on a sample...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10730

With the introduction of a new welfare benefit system in 2005, Germany implemented quite strict benefit sanctions for welfare recipients aged younger than 25 years. For all types of non-compliance except for missing appointments, their basic cash benefit is withdrawn for three months. A second sanction of the same type...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10321
published in: Annual Review of Economics, 8 2016, 521-546

Active labor market policies are massively used with the objective being to improve labor market outcomes of individuals out of work. Many observational evaluation studies have been published. In this review, we critically assess policy effectiveness. We emphasize insights from recent randomized controlled trials. In addition, we examine policy effects...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10248

In their IZA Discussion Paper 10247, Johansson and Lee claim that the main result (Proposition 3) in Abbring and Van den Berg (2003b) does not hold. We show that their claim is incorrect. At a certain point within their line of reasoning, they make a rather basic error while transforming...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9782

We develop a nonparametric instrumental variable approach for the estimation of average treatment effects on hazard rates and conditional survival probabilities, without model structure. We derive constructive identification proofs for average treatment effects under noncompliance and dynamic selection, exploiting instrumental variation taking place during ongoing spells. We derive asymptotic distributions...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9626

Unemployment insurance agencies may combat moral hazard by punishing refusals to apply to assigned vacancies. However, the possibility to report sick creates an additional moral hazard, since during sickness spells, minimum requirements on search behavior do not apply. This reduces the ex ante threat of sanctions. We analyze the effects...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9457

Public Employment Service (PES) agencies and caseworkers (CW) often have substantial leeway in the design and implementation of active labor market policies (ALMP) for the unemployed, resulting in variation of usage. This paper presents a novel framework in which this variation is used for the joint assessment of different ways...

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