Since 2014, Didier Fouarge has been heading the “Dynamics of the Labour Market” research programme of the Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA), Maastricht University. He has been researcher at ROA since 2007. He studied economics at the Facultés Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix (FUNDP) in Namur, Belgium. He holds a PhD from Tilburg University on the topic of poverty dynamics and social policy in Europe. His main research interests reside in scientific and applied research on labour market dynamics, labour supply decision (working time, retirement) and human capital.

He published in international Journals such as Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, British Journal of Industrial Relations, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Applied Economics, The International Journal of Manpower, LABOUR, Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Journal of Social Policy, Social Indicators Research, Journal of Applied Social Science Studies, as well as in books with distinguished publishers.

Didier joined IZA as a Research Fellow in May 2016.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 10407

We show that household heads with a strong internal economic locus of control are more likely to hold equity and hold a larger share of equity in their investment portfolio. This relation holds when we control for economic preferences and possible confounders such as financial literacy, overconfidence, optimism, trust, and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9430
Forthcoming in: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 2018

Using data from a stated preferences experiment in the Netherlands, we find that replacing full-time pension schemes with schemes that offer gradual retirement opportunities induce workers to retire one year later on average. Total life-time labour supply, however, decreases with 3.4 months because the positive effect of delayed retirement on...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8862

This paper investigates whether employers can induce employees to postpone retirement by offering access to training courses that maintain job proficiency. We use unique, matched employer–employee surveys for the Dutch public sector, which include detailed information on a wide range of HR practices applied in the organization, as well as...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8355
published in: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 2014, 106, 335-351

We relate risk attitudes and patience of young graduates from high-school, college and university, measured around the time that they start their labor market career in a large representative survey, to the riskiness and timing of earnings in the occupations they choose to work in. We find a systematic positive...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8069
Revised version published in: British Journal of Industrial Relations, 2017, 55 (1), 58-82.

Using data from the UK Skills Surveys, we show that the part-time pay penalty for female workers within low- and medium-skilled occupations decreased significantly over the period 1997-2006. The convergence in computer use between part-time and full-time workers within these occupations explains a large share of the decrease in the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7310
published in: De Economist, 2015, 163 (2), 203-232

This paper is the first that analyzes the relation between maternal work hours and the cognitive outcomes of young school-going children. When children attend school, the potential time working mothers miss out with their children, is smaller than when children do not yet attend school. At the same time, working...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7269
published in: De Economist, 2013, 161, 225–251

This paper investigates the causal effects of the announcement of an increase in the statutory pension age on employee retirement expectations. In June 2010, the Dutch government signed a new pension agreement with the employer and employee organizations that entailed an increase in the statutory pension age from 65 currently...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5423
published in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2013, 66 (5), 1172-1191

This paper analyzes whether part-time employment is beneficial for firm productivity in the service sector. Using a unique dataset on the Dutch pharmacy sector that includes the work hours of all employees and a “hard” physical measure of firm productivity, we estimate a production function including heterogeneous employment shares based...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5180
published in: Applied Economics, 2013, 45 (18), 2587-2601

Several studies document the fact that low-educated workers participate less often in further training than high-educated workers. The economic literature suggests that there is no significant difference in employer willingness to train low-educated workers, which leaves the question of why the low educated invest less in training unanswered. This paper...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4268
published in: Economics of Innovation and New Technology, 2010, 19(5), 407-421

Using a dataset of science and engineering graduates from 12 European countries, we analyse the determinants of labour migration after graduation. We find that not only wage gains are driving the migration decision, but also differences in labour market opportunities, past migration experience, and international student exchange are strong predictors...