Joshua Angrist is a Professor in the MIT Economics Department and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Previously, he was on the faculties of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Harvard University. His Bachelor's degree is from Oberlin College. Professor Angrist is a fellow of the Econometric Society and has published widely on the economic returns to schooling, the determinants of school quality, the relationship between military service and the civilian labor market, and econometric methodology. He has worked as a consultant to the U.S. and Israeli governments on labor market issues and data, and teaches courses on program and policy evaluation methods for government officials in a number of countries. Professor Angrist is currently working on projects related to education policy, achievement incentives, immigration, and econometric methods.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in November 2000.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10535

The past half-century has seen economic research become increasingly empirical, while the nature of empirical economic research has also changed. In the 1960s and 1970s, an empirical economist's typical mission was to "explain" economic variables like wages or GDP growth. Applied econometrics has since evolved to prioritize the estimation of...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10429

A growing number of school districts use centralized assignment mechanisms to allocate school seats in a manner that reflects student preferences and school priorities. Many of these assignment schemes use lotteries to ration seats when schools are oversubscribed. The resulting random assignment opens the door to credible quasi-experimental research designs...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8985

Lottery estimates suggest oversubscribed urban charter schools boost student achievement markedly. But these estimates needn't capture treatment effects for students who haven't applied to charter schools or for students attending charters for which demand is weak. This paper reports estimates of the effects of charter school attendance on middle-schoolers in...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8959
published in: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2017, 9 (4), 216-249

An instrumental variables (IV) identification strategy that exploits statutory class size caps shows significant achievement gains in smaller classes in Italian primary schools. Gains from small classes are driven mainly by schools in Southern Italy, suggesting a substantial return to class size reductions for residents of the Mezzogiorno. In addition...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7429

In the canonical regression discontinuity (RD) design for applicants who face an award or admissions cutoff, causal effects are nonparametrically identified for those near the cutoff. The effect of treatment on inframarginal applicants is also of interest, but identification of such effects requires stronger assumptions than those required for identification...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6790

Parents gauge school quality in part by the level of student achievement and a school's racial mix. The importance of school characteristics in the housing market can be seen in the jump in house prices at school district boundaries where peer characteristics change. The question of whether schools with more...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6525
published in: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2013, 5 (4), 1-27

Estimates using admissions lotteries suggest that urban charter schools boost student achievement, while charter schools in other settings do not. Using the largest available sample of lotteried applicants to charter schools, we explore student-level and school-level explanations for this difference in Massachusetts. In an econometric framework that isolates sources of...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5690
Published in Journal of Policy Analysis and Management

The nation's largest charter management organization is the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP). KIPP schools are emblematic of the No Excuses approach to public education, a highly standardized and widely replicated charter model that features a long school day, an extended school year, selective teacher hiring, strict behavior norms, and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4800
published in: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2010, 24 (2), 3-30

This essay reviews progress in empirical economics since Leamer's (1983) critique. Leamer highlighted the benefits of sensitivity analysis, a procedure in which researchers show how their results change with changes in specification or functional form. Sensitivity analysis has had a salutary but not a revolutionary effect on econometric practice. As...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3628
published as "Schooling and the Vietnam-Era GI Bill: Evidence from the Draft Lottery" in: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2011, 3 (2), 96-118

Military service reduces civilian labor market experience but subsidizes higher education through the GI Bill. Both of these channels are likely to affect civilian earnings. New estimates of the effects of military service using Vietnam-era draft-lottery instruments show post-service earnings effects close to zero in 2000, in contrast with earlier...

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