Chris M. Herbst is an Assistant Professor in the School of Public Affairs and a Faculty Affiliate in the School of Social Work and the Center for Population Dynamics at Arizona State University. He received a Ph.D. in Public Policy in 2007 from the University of Maryland (College Park) School of Public Policy. His dissertation on U.S. child care subsidy policy and welfare reform received the 2006-2007 Ph.D. Dissertation Award from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM). In 2007, he received a Fulbright Fellowship to study the Danish welfare and labor market systems at Aalborg University in Denmark.

Chris' research focuses primarily on understanding the impact of child care and welfare policies on the well-being of children and parents. His research projects have examined the impact of the U.S. child care subsidy system on children's cognitive and behavioral development as well as maternal health and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Another stream of research assesses the effect of recent reforms to tax and transfer policies on single mothers' subjective well-being, as measured by survey questions on happiness and life satisfaction. Chris' work has been published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Journal of Population Economics, Journal of Economic Psychology, and Journal of Urban Economics.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in November 2012.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11140

This paper examines racial and ethnic discrimination in the labor market for center-based child care teachers. We assemble a novel dataset that combines a resume audit study of child care centers in several large U.S. cities with a follow-up survey of the providers in the original audit sample. The provider...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10702

Many preschool-age children in the U.S. attend center-based child care programs that are of low quality. This paper examines the extent to which teacher qualifications – widely considered important inputs to classroom quality – are valued by providers during the hiring process. To do so, we administered a resume audit...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10383

Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) are increasingly deployed by states to monitor and improve the quality of non-parental child care settings. By making information on program quality accessible to the public, QRIS attempts to alter parental preferences for quality-related attributes and encourage competition between providers. This paper draws on...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9076

Broadband (high-speed) internet access expanded rapidly from 1999 to 2007. This expansion is associated with higher economic growth and labor market activity. In this paper, we examine whether the rollout also affected the social connections teens make. Specifically, we look at the relationship between increased broadband access and teen fertility....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9072

Anecdotal evidence suggests that the cost of child care in the U.S. has increased substantially over the past few decades. This paper marshals data from a variety of sources to rigorously assess the issue. It begins by using nationally representative survey data to trace the evolution in families' child care...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8485

This paper assesses the short-run impact of first-year maternal employment on low-income children's cognitive development. The identification strategy exploits an important feature of the U.S.'s welfare work requirement rules – namely, age-of-youngest-child exemptions – as a source of quasi-experimental variation in maternal employment. The 1996 welfare reform law empowered states...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7944

Previous research consistently finds that racially-based residential segregation is associated with poor economic, health, and social outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between residential segregation and self-reported happiness. Using panel data from the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), we begin by estimating ordinary...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7846

This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the Lanham Act of 1940, a heavily-subsidized and universal child care program that was administered throughout the U.S. during World War II. I begin by estimating the impact of the Lanham Act on maternal employment using 1940 and 1950 Census data in a...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7261

This paper contributes to the small but growing literature evaluating the health effects of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). In particular, we use data from the National Survey of Families and Households to study the impact of the 1990 federal EITC expansion on several outcomes related to mental health...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7039
published in: Journal of Public Economics, 2013, 105, 86–105

Although a large literature examines the effect of non-parental child care on preschool-aged children's cognitive development, few studies deal convincingly with the potential endogeneity of child care choices. Using a panel of infants and toddlers from the Birth cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B), this paper attempts to...

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