John T. Addison is Professor of Economics at the University of South Carolina (U.S.A.) and Chair in Economics at the University of Durham (U.K.). Addison is concurrently research fellow at the Center for Labor and Employment Law at New York University, the Institute for Employment Research (IAB) in Nuremberg, and the Rimini Center for Economic Analysis. Addison was educated at the London School of Economics (B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D). In 1997 he was John M. Olin Visiting Professor of Labor Economics and Public Policy at Washington University in St. Louis. Addison has published widely in the major economics and labor economics journals, including the Journal of Business, Review of Economics & Statistics, American Economic Review, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Labor Economics, and Industrial and Labor Relations Review. He is the author/editor of a number of labor economics texts, including The Market for Labor: An Analytical Treatment(with W. Stanley Siebert), The Economic Analysis of Unions: New Approaches and Evidence(with Barry T. Hirsch), Job Displacement: Consequences and Implications for Policy, Labor Markets and Social Security(with Paul J.J. Welfens), The International Handbook of Trade Unions (with Claus Schnabel), Recent Development in Labor Economics, and, most recently, The Economics of Codetermination: Lessons from the German Experience. His immediate research interests are minimum wages, the erosion of collective bargaining, high dimensional fixed effects models of wage variation, and female promotion and earnings.
He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in April 2001.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11114

Job mobility, especially early in a career, is an important source of wage growth. This effect is typically attributed to heterogeneity in the quality of employee-employer matches, with individuals learning of their abilities and discovering the tasks at which they are most productive through job search. That is, job mobility...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10899

Using cross-country data from the European Company Survey, we investigate the relationship between workplace employee representation and five behavioral outcomes: strike incidence, the climate of industrial relations, sickness/absenteeism, employee motivation, and staff retention. The evidence is mixed. From one perspective, the expression of collective voice through works councils may be...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10575

This paper investigates the determinants of industrial conflict in companies, using a multi-country workplace inquiry for 2009 and 2013 and various measures of strike activity. The principal goal is to address the effect of formal workplace representation on strikes, distinguishing in the first instance between works councils on the one...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9587
published in: IZA Journal of Labor Policy, 2016, 5: 19

This paper addresses the design of the machinery of collective bargaining from the perspective of the needs of microeconomic and macroeconomic flexibility. In the former context, greater attention is given over to enterprise flexibility than external adjustment. In the latter context, close attention is paid to changes in collective bargaining...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9323
revised version published as 'Contract innovation in Germany: An Economic Evaluation of Pacts for Competitiveness' in: British Journal of Industrial Relations, 2017, 55(3), 500-526.

Pacts for employment and competitiveness are an integral component of the ongoing process of decentralization of collective bargaining in Germany, a phenomenon that has been hailed as key to that nation's economic resurgence. Yet little is known about the effects of pacts on firm performance. The evidence largely pertains to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9221

This paper provides estimates of the union wage gap in Portugal, a nation until recently lacking independent data on union density at firm level. Having estimated nonlinear and linear estimates of the effect of union density on the wage gap, the next stage of the analysis seeks to account for...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9078
revised version forthcoming in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review

This paper updates the major study by Macpherson and Hirsch (1995) of the effect of the gender composition of occupations on female (and male) earnings. Using large representative national samples of employees from the Current Population Survey, cross-sectional estimates of the impact of proportion female in an occupation (or feminization)...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8943
revised version published as 'Unions and Collective Bargaining in the Wake of the Great Recession: Evidence from Portugal' in: British Journal of Industrial Relations, 2017, 55(3), 551-576.

This paper provides the first definitive estimates of union density in Portugal, 2010-2012, using a unique dataset. The determinants of union density at firm level are first modeled. Next, we draw upon a very recent study of the union wage premium to provide summary estimates of the union wage gap...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8420
published in: IZA Journal of Labor Economics, 2015, 4, 1-16.

Just as the standard two-way fixed effects model for estimating the impact of minimum wages on employment has been sharply criticized for its neglect of spatial heterogeneity so, too, have the latest models been attacked for their uncritical use of state- or county-specific linear trends (and other spatial counterfactuals). Further...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8359

Recent studies have pointed to the association between declining collective bargaining coverage and rising overall wage inequality. This association holds more or less across-the-board, at least for broad swathes of recent history. That said, the exact contribution of deununionization is a matter of debate, perhaps no more so than in...

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