Steffen Künn is Assistant Professor at the School of Business and Economics at the Maastricht University.

Before he held positions at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn and the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) in Berlin.

He received his master degree in economics from the Free University Berlin in 2008 and a PhD in economics from the University of Potsdam in 2012.

His main research interests include applied labor economics and in particular the evaluation of labor market policy. Beside the evaluation of traditional programs of active labor market policy (such as wage subsidies, training etc), he is particularly interested in the effectiveness of programs which aim at promoting self-employment among the unemployed.

Steffen Künn joined IZA as a Research Fellow in November 2015.


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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11169

The appealing idea of geographically relocating unemployed job seekers from depressed to prosperous regions and hence reducing unemployment leads to industrialised countries offering financial support to unemployed job seekers when searching for and/or accepting jobs in distant regions. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the existence of these...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10177
published in: Labour Economics, 2016, 42, 177-193

In some countries including Germany unemployed workers can increase their income by working a few hours per week. The intention is to keep unemployed job seekers attached to the labour market and to increase their job-finding probabilities. To analyze the unemployment dynamics of job seekers with and without marginal employment,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9628
published in: European Economic Review, 2016, 86, 87-108

Many countries support business start-ups to spur economic growth and reduce unemployment with different programmes. Evaluation studies of such programmes commonly rely on the conditional independence assumption (CIA), allowing a causal interpretation of the results only if all relevant variables affecting participation and success are accounted for. While the entrepreneurship...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9183
revised version published in: Journal of Public Economics, 2017, 148, 136-151

In many European countries, labor markets are characterized by high regional disparities in terms of unemployment rates on the one hand and low geographical mobility among the unemployed on the other hand. This is somewhat surprising and raises the question of why only minor shares of unemployed job seekers relocate...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8817
published in: Small Business Economics, 45(1), 2015, 165-190

Offering unemployed individuals a subsidy to become self-employed is a widespread active labor market policy strategy. Previous studies have illustrated its high effectiveness to help participants escaping unemployment and improving their labor market prospects compared to other unemployed individuals. However, the examination of start-up subsidies from a business perspective has...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7971
revised version published in: IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, 2014, 3(6), 1-20 [Open Access]

This reference paper describes the sampling and contents of the IZA Evaluation Dataset Survey and outlines its vast potential for research in labor economics. The data have been part of a unique IZA project to connect administrative data from the German Federal Employment Agency with innovative survey data to study...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7460
published in Regional Studies, 2014, 48 (6), 1108-1134

Recent microeconometric evaluation studies have shown that start-up subsidies for unemployed individuals are an effective policy tool to improve long-term employment and income prospects of participants, in particular compared to other active labor market programs (e.g. training, job search assistance or job creation schemes). What has not been examined yet...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6830
published in: Journal of Population Economics, 2015, 28(4), 1005-1043

A shortage of skilled labor and low female labor market participation are problems many developed countries have to face. Besides activating inactive women, one possible solution is to support the re-integration of unemployed women. Due to female-specific labor market constraints (preferences for flexible working hours, discrimination), this is a difficult...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6499
substantially revised version available as IZA DP No. 10177

In some countries including Germany unemployed workers can increase their income during job search by taking up "marginal employment" up to a threshold without any deduction from their benefits. Marginal employment can be considered as a wage subsidy as it lowers labour costs for firms owing to reduced social security...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6222

A substantial number of young unemployed participate in active labor market programs (ALMP) in Germany each year. While the aims of these programs are clear – a fast re-integration into employment or enrollment in further education – a comprehensive analysis of their effectiveness has yet to be conducted. We fill...

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