Mutlu Yuksel is an Associate Professor at the Department of Economics, Dalhousie University. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Houston in May 2007. His research interests include Labor Economics, Applied Microeconomics, and Health Economics. He has been mainly working on intergenerational mobility and the possible channels of mobility for natives and immigrants. In addition, He studied the effects of low skilled immigration on US natives. His current research focuses on discrimination, assimilation, and naturalization.

Mutlu worked at IZA as a Research Associate from August 2007 until August 2010 and continues to be affiliated with IZA as a Research Fellow.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 10830
published in: Labour Economics, 2017, 49, 145-161

This paper examines the persistent effects of historical labor market institutions and policies on women's long-term labor market outcomes. We quantify these enduring effects by exploring quasi-experimental variation in Germany's post-World War II mandatory reconstruction policy, which compelled women to work in the rubble removal and reconstruction process. Using difference-in-differences...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10778

This paper provides causal evidence on the importance of socioeconomic circumstances, socialization, and childhood events, in the formation of adult political behaviour and attitudes, using region-by-cohort variation in exposure to the Jewish expulsions in Nazi Germany as a quasi-experiment. We find that the expulsion of Jewish professionals had long-lasting detrimental...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8425
published in: Research in Labor Economics, 2015, 1-33

The changes in women and men's work lives have been considerable in recent decades. Yet much of the recent research on gender differences in employment and earnings has been of a more snapshot nature rather than taking a longer comparative look at evolving patterns. In this paper, we use 50...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7239
published in: Applied Economics, 2016, 8(29): 2771-2784.

This paper provides causal evidence on the long-term legacies of postwar reconstruction and mandatory employment on women's family formation outcomes such as marriage, age at first marriage and divorce. We exploit city-by-cohort variation in the intensity of World War II reconstruction in Germany which determined the mobilization of women in...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6148
substantially revised paper appeared as DP No. 10830

During World War II, more than one-half million tons of bombs were dropped in aerial raids on German cities, destroying about forty percent of the total housing stock nationwide. With a large fraction of the male population gone, the reconstruction process had mainly fallen on women in postwar Germany. This...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5850
revised version published in: American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 2015, 7 (3), 58-85

This paper provides causal evidence on long-term consequences of Jewish expulsions in Nazi Germany on the educational attainment and political outcomes of German children. We combine a unique city-level dataset on the fraction of Jewish population residing in Germany before the Nazi Regime with individual survey data from the German...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5120
revised version published as 'The Decreasing Effect of Skin Tone on Women's Full-Time Employment' in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2012, 65 (2), 398-426

We investigate the effect of skin tone on employment probabilities in a longitudinal data set. Using an objective measure of skin tone from a light-spectrometer and a self-reported measure of race we find that over time the effect of skin tone on employment has diminished. These results hold both across...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5108
published in: Gil Epstein and Ira Gang (eds.), Migration and Culture, Frontiers of Economics and Globalization, Vol. 8, Emerald Publishing, Bingley, 2010, 415-443

In this chapter, we investigate the effects of vulnerability on income and employment in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and Serbia using a unique 2004 UNDP dataset. Treating the collapse of the former Yugoslavia as a natural experiment, we compare three groups that have been differently affected by the wars...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4677

In this paper, I analyze intergenerational mobility of immigrants and natives in Germany. Using the German Socioeconomic Panel (GSOEP), I find intergenerational elasticities that range from 0.19 to 0.26 for natives and from 0.37 to 0.40 for immigrants. These elasticity estimates are lower than typically found for the U.S. and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4674

Using U.S. manufacturing data, Griliches (1969) found evidence suggesting that capital equipment was more substitutable for unskilled than skilled labor. Griliches formulated this finding as the capital-skill complementarity hypothesis. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the capital-skill complementarity framework holds for Ghana manufacturing plants in industry and...