Timothy J. Halliday

Research Fellow

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Timothy Halliday is an Associate Professor of Economics and the Chair of the Department of Economics at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He conducts research in health and development economics with a strong emphasis on micro-econometric methodology. He has published numerous articles across many fields and disciplines. He earned his PhD in Economics from Princeton University and he joined IZA as a Research Fellow in November 2007.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11304

Studies of intergenerational mobility have largely ignored health despite the central importance of health to welfare. We present the first estimates of intergenerational health mobility in the US by using repeated measures of self-reported health status (SRH) during adulthood from the PSID. Our main finding is that there is substantially...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10808
Chenggang Wang, Huixia Wang, Timothy J. Halliday

We estimate the impact of the Great Recession of 2007–2009 on health outcomes in the United States. We show that a one percentage point increase in the unemployment rate resulted in a 7.8–8.8 percent increase in reports of poor health. Mental health was also adversely impacted and reports of chronic...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10215

In 2007, the State of Arizona passed the Legal Arizona Workers Act (LAWA) which required all employers to verify the legal status of all prospective employees. Replicating existing results from the literature, we show that LAWA displaced about 40,000 Mexican-born people from Arizona. About 25% of these displaced persons relocated...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10156

Mexican wage inequality rose following Mexico's accession to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade/World Trade Organization in 1986. Since the mid-1990s, however, wage inequality has been falling. Since most trade models suggest that output prices can affect factor prices, this paper explores the relationship between output prices and wage...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9398

The high correlation of industrial pollutant emissions complicates the estimation of the impact of industrial pollutants on health. To circumvent this, we use emissions from Kīlauea volcano, uncorrelated with other pollution sources, to estimate the impact of pollutants on local emergency room admissions and a precise measure of costs. A...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9215

Large wage differences between countries ("place premiums") are well documented. Theory suggests that factor price convergence should follow increased migration, capital flows, and commercial integration. All three have increased between the United States and Mexico over the last 25 years. This paper evaluates the degree of wage convergence between these...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8797

"Glass ceilings" and "sticky floors" are typical explanations for the low representation of women in top executive positions, but a focus on gender differences in promotions provides only a partial explanation. We consider the life-cycle of executive employment, which allows for a full characterization of the gender composition of executive...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8672

We investigate sibling correlations in health status using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and Bayesian methods that allow us to estimate the covariance structure of a system of latent variable equations. Across a battery of outcomes, we estimate that between 50% and 60% of health status can be attributed...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8254

Neoclassical trade theory suggests that factor price convergence should follow increased commercial integration. Rising commercial integration and foreign direct investment followed the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement between the United States and Mexico. This paper evaluates the degree of wage convergence between Mexico and the United States between 1988...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7157
published in: Social Science and Medicine, 2014, 113, 15-22

In this paper, we use the death file from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to investigate the relationship between county-level unemployment rates and mortality risk. After partialling out important confounding factors including baseline health status as well as state and industry fixed effects, we show that poor local labor...

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