Rainer Winkelmann studied economics at the Universities of Konstanz, Paris, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Munich. Since 2001, he is Professor of Statistics and Empirical Economic Research at the University of Zurich, and, since 2015, Chairman of the Economics Department. He also taught at Dartmouth College, USA, and the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and was visiting professor at Harvard University, Syracuse University and UCLA. He has acted as an advisor to the German and New Zealand governments, on issues such as immigration policy, the international mobility of highly skilled workers, trade liberalization, and income inequality. He is chairman of the advisory boards of the DIW/SOEP Survey committee and the KOF Swiss Economic Institute.

His research interests include empirical labor economics, in particular unemployment, migration, and income distribution; and econometric models for count and panel data. He has published a book "Econometric Analysis of Count Data", and numerous papers in edited books and national and international journals such as American Economic Journal, Economica, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Journal of Business and Economics Statistics, Journal of Econometrics, Journal of International Economics, and Journal of Population Economics.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 11182

The maximum likelihood estimator for the regression coefficients, β, in a panel binary response model with fixed effects can be severely biased if N is large and T is small, a consequence of the incidental parameters problem. This has led to the development of conditional maximum likelihood estimators and, more...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5443
published in: Journal of the Royal Statistical Society A, 2015, 178, 685–703.

The paper re-examines existing estimators for the panel data fixed effects ordered logit model, proposes a new one, and studies the sampling properties of these estimators in a series of Monte Carlo simulations. There are two main findings. First, we show that some of the estimators used in the literature...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2346
published in: Journal of Happiness Studies, 2009, 10 (4), 421-430

It has been shown in past research that unemployment has a large negative impact on subjective well-being of individuals. In this paper, I explore whether and to what extent people with more social capital are sheltered from the harmful effects of unemployment. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel 1984-2004,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2019
published in: Research in Labor Economics, 2010, 30, 233–251

Sorting of people on the labor market not only assures the most productive use of valuable skills but also generates individual utility gains if people experience an optimal match between job characteristics and their preferences. Based on individual data on reported satisfaction with life it is possible to assess these...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1487
published in: Journal of Population Economics, 2011, 24 (3), 1033-1051

Much progress has been made in recent years on developing and applying a direct measure of utility using survey questions on subjective well-being. In this paper we explore whether this new type of measurement can be fruitfully applied to the study of interdependent utility in general, and altruism between parents...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1391
published in: Schriften des Vereins für Socialpolitik, 2006, 313, 39-54.

We examine the effect of single motherhood on children's secondary school track choice using a sample of 14 years old children drawn from the German Socio-Economic Panel. In line with previous studies for the U.S., the U.K. and Sweden, we find a negative correlation between disrupted family structure and children's...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1175
published in: Social Indicators Research, 2010, 95 (1), 111-128

Empirical studies on the relationship between income and happiness commonly use standard ordered response models, the most well-known representatives being the ordered logit and the ordered probit. However, these models restrict the marginal probability effects by design, and therefore limit the analysis of distributional aspects of a change in income,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1016
published in: Empirical Economics, 2005, 30 (3), 749-761

The previous literature on the determinants of individual well-being has failed to fully account for the interdependencies in well-being at the family level. This paper develops an ordered probit model with multiple random effects that allows to identify the intrafamily correlation in well-being. The parameters of the model can be...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 894
published in: Journal of Socio-Economics, 2006, 35 (2), 197-208

This paper uses recent data for Germany and a new outcome variable to assess the consequences of parental separation on the well-being of youths. In particular, it is considered how subjective well-being, elicited from an ordinal 11-point general life satisfaction question, differs between youths living in intact and non-intact families,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 331
published in: Schmollers Jahrbuch: Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften / Journal of Applied Social Science Studies, 2002, 122 (2), 155-178

The paper studies the demand for foreign graduates at the firm level. Using a unique dataset on recruitment policies of firms in four European countries, the determinants of demand for internationally mobile high-skilled employees are established. I investigate the number, origin, skills, and functions of foreign graduates, as well as...