Randall K. Q. Akee

Research Fellow

University of California, Los Angeles

Randall Akee is an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles in the Department of Public Policy. He completed his Ph.D. at Harvard University in June 2006.

Prior to his doctoral studies, Randall earned a Masters degree in International and Development Economics at Yale University. He also spent several years working for the State of Hawaii Office of Hawaiian Affairs Economic Development Division.

His main research interests are Labor Economics, Economic Development and Migration.

From August 2006 until August 2009 he was a Research Associate at IZA, where he also served as Deputy Program Director for Employment and Development. Since September 2009, he has been an IZA Research Fellow. Prior to UCLA, he was an Assistant Professor 2009-2012 at Tufts University and spent a year at the Center for Labor Economics at University of California, Berkeley for AY 2011-2012.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10416

In this paper we use confidential-use Census and administrative data to produce the first national estimates of excess mortality, institutionalization and homelessness for the largest Indigenous population in Canada from the ages of 5 to 64. We identify mortality rates at least twice the Canadian average and find exceptionally high...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6754
revised version forthcoming in: Journal of Comparative Economics

This paper presents an empirical examination of economic and institutional development. Utilizing a novel data set on American Indian tribal nations, we investigate how constitutional design affects economic development, while holding the broader legal and political environment fixed. Instrumental variables regressions, using the party of the US President at the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6226
revised version published in: Journal of Law and Economics, 2014, 57 (2), 349-386

We explore three hitherto poorly understood characteristics of the human trafficking market – the cross-border ease of mobility of traffickers, the relative bargaining strength of traffickers and final buyers, and the elasticity of buyers' demand. In a model of two-way bargaining, the exact configuration of these characteristics is shown to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5142
published in: Gil S. Epstein and Ira N. Gang (eds.), Migration and Culture, Frontiers of Economics and Globalization, Vol. 8, Emerald Publishing: 2010

Ethnic conflicts and their links to international human trafficking have recently received a surge in international attention. It appears that ethnic conflicts exacerbate the internal displacement of individuals from networks of family and community, and their access to economic and social safety nets. These same individuals are then vulnerable to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5135
published as 'Young Adult Obesity and Household Income: Effects of Unconditional Cash Transfers', American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2013, 5 (2), 1-28

This paper examines how exogenous income transfers during adolescence affect contemporaneous body mass index (BMI) measures and young adult obesity rates using evidence from the Great Smoky Mountains Study of Youth. The effects of extra income differ depending on the households’ initial socio-economic status, tracing out an inverted U-shaped relationship...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5120
revised version published as 'The Decreasing Effect of Skin Tone on Women's Full-Time Employment' in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2012, 65 (2), 398-426

We investigate the effect of skin tone on employment probabilities in a longitudinal data set. Using an objective measure of skin tone from a light-spectrometer and a self-reported measure of race we find that over time the effect of skin tone on employment has diminished. These results hold both across...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3897

In this paper we examine whether where one acquires their human capital matters in earnings regressions. We focus on a nationally-representative US data set and find that there is little difference between a measure of total years of education and measures for US and foreign-based years of education. There is...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3520
published in: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2010, 2 (1), 86-115

Identifying the effect of parental incomes on child outcomes is difficult due to the correlation of unobserved ability, education levels and income. Previous research has relied on the use of instrumental variables to identify the effect of a change in household income on the young adult outcomes of the household’s...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3268
revised version published in: Economic Development and Cultural Change, 2010, 58 (2), 323-344.

Existing research examining the self-selection of immigrants suffers from a lack of information on the immigrants’ labor force activities in the home country, quotas limiting who is allowed to enter the destination country, and non-economic factors such as internal civil strife in the home country. Using a novel data set...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3263
published in: Journal of Development Economics, 2011, 96 (2), 409 - 421

I report the measurement error in self-reported earnings for a developing country. Administrative data from the Federated States of Micronesia’s (FSM) Social Security office are matched to the FSM Census data for the wage sector employed. I find that the error in annual self-reported earnings is centered on zero but...

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