Patrick Puhani is professor of Labour Economics at Leibniz University of Hannover. Previously, he was professor of Applied Econometrics at Darmstadt University of Technology. Besides IZA, he is also a research fellow of the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), University College London (UCL); the Equipe de Recherche sur les Marchés, l'Emploi et la Simulation (ERMES), Université Paris II (Panthéon-Assas); and the Swiss Institute for Empirical Economic Research (SEW), University of St. Gallen.

Patrick Puhani received his undergraduate education in Economics at Queens' College, University of Cambridge, England, where he obtained a Master of Arts degree. From 1995 to 1999 he was working with the Center for European Economic Research (ZEW) in Mannheim, Germany, and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Munich, Germany, in 1998. From 1999 to 2004, Patrick Puhani worked at SIAW, University of St. Gallen, where he obtained his Habilitation in 2004. During the academic year 2001/2002, Patrick Puhani was a visiting scholar at the Economics Department of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA and during the academic year 2010/2011 he was visiting the Economics Department and the Center for Labor Economics at the University of California at Berkeley.

Patrick Puhani's research interests are in the field of labor economics and applied microeconometrics. His works have in published among others in Economics Letters, Empirical Economics, the German Economic Review, Kyklos, Labour, the Journal of the European Economic Association, the Journal of the German Statistical Society, the Journal of Health Economics, the Journal of Human Resources, the Journal of Population Economics, the Journal of Regional Science, and Research in Labor Economics.

Filter

Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11328

We estimate whether migration can be an equilibrating force in the labour market by comparing pre- and post-crisis migration movements at the regional level in both Europe and the United States, and their association with asymmetric labour market shocks. Based on fixed-effects regressions using regional panel data, we find that...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11208
Bethlehem A. Argaw, Patrick A. Puhani

We use administrative panel data on about a quarter of a million students in the German state of Hesse to estimate the causal effect of class size on school tracking outcomes after elementary school. Our identification strategy relies on the quasi-random assignment of students to different class sizes based on...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11139

With girls having overtaken boys in many education indicators, the “feminization” of elementary school teaching is causing debates about disadvantages for male students. Using administrative panel data on the universe of students, teachers and schools for a German state, I exploit within school and within teacher variation to determine teacher...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9106
published in: Review of Economics of the Household, 2017, 15 (4), 1137–1158

We document the educational integration of immigrant children with a focus on the link between family size and educational decisions and distinguishing particularly between first- and second-generation immigrants and between source country groups. First, for immigrant adolescents, we show family-size adjusted convergence to almost native levels of higher education track...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8787
published in: Labour Economics, 2016, 38, 12 - 23

To estimate the effects of large cuts in pensions on the age of first benefit receipt, we exploit two natural experiments in which such cuts affect a group of repatriated ethnic German workers. The pensions were cut by about 12%, yet, according to our regression discontinuity estimates based on administrative...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8372
published in: Applied Economics Letters, 2015, 22(8), 603-612

Using retrospective survey data that covers 1939, 1950, 1960, and 1971, I compare individual-level changes in employment industry and occupational status in Germany from the beginning of World War II to the post-war reconstruction era dubbed the Economic Miracle (Wirtschaftswunder). This comparison reveals that, with only a few exceptions, labor...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7921

The question of whether migration can be an equilibrating force in the labour market is an important criterion for an optimal currency area. It is of particular interest currently in the context of high and rising levels of labour market disparities, in particular within the Eurozone where there is no...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7897
published in: Economic Journal, 2017, 127 (603), 1348–1380

Despite its efficiency in tailoring education to the needs of students, a tracking system has the inherent problem of misallocating students to tracks because of incomplete information at the time of the tracking decision. This paper investigates the effects of attending a more advanced track in middle school on long-term...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4607
published in: Journal of Health Economics, 2010, 29 (2), 285-302

We evaluate the effects of a reduction in sick pay from 100 to 80% of the wage. Unlike previous literature, apart from absence from work, we also consider effects on doctor/hospital visits and subjective health indicators. We also add to the literature by estimating both switch-on and switch-off effects, because...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3820
published as 'The Effects of Parental Leave on Training for Young Women' in: Journal of Population Economics, 2011, 24 (2), 731-760

Using three representative individual-level datasets for West Germany, we estimate the effect of the extension of maternity leave from 18 to 36 months on young women's participation in job-related training. Specifically, we employ difference-indifferences identification strategies using control groups of older women and older women together with young and older...

Type
Display
Type