Jan C. van Ours

Research Fellow

Erasmus University Rotterdam

Jan van Ours (1954) is professor of Applied Economics at the Department of Applied Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam. He is also professorial fellow at the Department of Economics, University of Melbourne, CentER Fellow and CEPR Fellow. Jan van Ours studied mining engineering at the Technical University in Delft and economics at Erasmus University Rotterdam, where he also got his Ph.D. He has published in journals like American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Review of Economic Studies, Journal of Labor Economics, Economic Journal, European Economic Review, Journal of Economic History, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Health Economics, and Health Economics. Currently he is managing editor of De Economist.

In 1996 he was awarded with the Hicks-Tinbergen medal of the European Economic Association (joint with Geert Ridder).

In 2009 he was President of the European Society of Population Economics. From 2011-2014 he was President of the European Association of Labour Economists.

Jan van Ours joined IZA as a Research Fellow in October 1999.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11043

Partnered individuals are happier than singles. This can be because partnership leads to more satisfactory subjective well-being or because happier people are more likely to find a partner. We analyze Dutch panel data to investigate whether there is a causal effect of partnership on subjective well-being. Our data allow us...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10771

The 1986 US Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) was directed at tackling the problem of growing unauthorized migration through legalization of unauthorized immigrants, increasing border security and sanctioning employers who hired unauthorized immigrants. Our paper investigates how the IRCA affected the migration dynamics of Mexican immigrants focusing on their...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10488

We study the impact of early cannabis use on the school to work transition of young men. Our empirical approach accounts for common unobserved confounders that jointly affect selection into cannabis use and the transition from school to work using a multivariate mixed proportional hazard framework in which unobserved heterogeneities...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10333

Our paper studies the effects of dialect-speaking on job characteristics of Dutch workers, in particular on their hourly wages. The unconditional difference in median hourly wages between standard Dutch speakers and dialect speakers is about 10.6% for males and 6.7% for females. If we take into account differences in personal...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10174

We examine the effect of the sending-off of a player on the goal-scoring rates in FIFA World Cup matches in tournaments from 1998 to 2014. We use a hazard rate framework in which the effect of a red card is modeled as a shift in the goal-scoring rate. A red...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10121
published in: Journal of Safety Research, 2017, 61, 41-51

From the point of view of workplace safety, it is important to know whether having a temporary job has an effect on the severity of workplace accidents. We present an empirical analysis on the severity of workplace accidents by type of contract. We used micro data collected by the Italian...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9815

Our paper revisits Okun's relationship between observed unemployment rates and output gaps. We include in the relationship the effect of labour market institutions as well as age and gender effects. Our empirical analysis is based on 20 OECD countries over the period 1985-2013. We find that the share of temporary...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9800
published in: Economics of Education Review, 2016, 54, 1-15

This paper studies the educational consequences of language proficiency by investigating the relationship between dialect-speaking and academic performance of 5-6 year old children in the Netherlands. We find that dialect-speaking has a modestly negative effect on boys' language test scores. In addition, we study whether there are spillover effects of...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9472
forthcoming in: Economic Journal, 2017

This paper investigates how winning a substantial lottery prize affects labor supply. Analyzing data from Dutch State Lottery winners, we find that earnings are affected but not employment. Lottery prize winners reduce their hours of work but they are not very likely to withdraw from the labor force. We also...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9470
published in: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 2016, 125, 192-211

Using employees' longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, part-time working women are as likely to receive training as full-time working...

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