Fernando Lozano received his PhD in Economics from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2005. He is currently Associate Professor of Economics at Pomona College, in Claremont, California. He is a labor economist whose research focuses on immigration and labor supply. His current projects examine how American workers’ schedule flexibility has changed during the last 30 years; how does more stringent border control enforcement determine immigrants’ labor market outcomes; and how do government policies determine the flows of internationally adopted children to the U.S.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in May 2009.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10685

A growing literature has documented the displacement effects of tougher interior immigration enforcement measures; yet, we still lack an understanding of where the displaced populations are choosing to relocate. In this paper, we address this question using Arizona as a case study. Specifically, we examine the destinations of Mexican non-citizens...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8950

We analyse how a change in the probability of winning a tournament affects an agent's effort using the qualification rules for entry into the group and playoff stages of the UEFA Champions' League. Our results suggest that increasing the number of slots that a national league gets in the Champions'...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6552

Are American workers less likely to observe a religious holiday now than they were 30 years ago? In this paper I use evidence from religious holidays to explore the evolution of market hours' flexibility and religious observance during the last thirty years. To do so, I take advantage of three...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5492

We present estimates of the effect of legal immigration status on earnings of undocumented workers. Our contribution to the literature centers on a two-step procedure that allows us to first estimate the legal status of an immigrant and then estimate the effect of the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA)...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5328
published in: Carlos Vargas-Silva et al. (eds.) Handbook on Research Methods on Migration, Edward Elgar, 2012

In this chapter we provide a brief overview of the main empirical tools used by economists to study international migration. We begin by exploring the three broad research areas that economists examine when researching immigration. We then explore the strengths and shortcomings of the standard methods, and highlight new methods...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4898
published in: Feminist Economics, 2013, 19 (1), 76-110

Since 1986 the United States has made considerable efforts to curb illegal immigration. This has resulted in an increase in migration costs for undocumented immigrants. More stringent border enforcement either deters potential illegal immigrants from coming to the U.S., or moves the point of crossing for illegal immigrants from traditional...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4547

Children adopted from abroad are an immigrant group about which little is known. According to the U.S. Census more than one and a half million children living in the U.S. are adopted, with fifteen percent of them born abroad. In fact more than twenty thousand adopted orphans from abroad enter...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4317
published in: Review of Economics of the Household, 2010, 8 (1), 83-104

I analyze the length of the workweek of foreign-born workers in the U.S. I concentrate on workers supplying long hours of work − 50 or more weekly hours and document that immigrants are less likely than natives to work long hours. Surprisingly, these differences are greatest among highly educated and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4217
published in: Economic Inquiry, 2011, 49(2), 512-529

In this paper I explore the flexibility of the work week in the United States, using the FIFA Soccer World Cup as a natural experiment. My empirical strategy exploits the exogenous variation that arises due to which country hosts the World Cup, as this will determine the time games are...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3301
published as 'Mexican Immigrants, Labour Market Assimilation and the Current Population: The Sensitivity of Results Across Seemingly Equivalent Surveys' in: International Migration, 2015, 53(2), 250–262

In this paper we compare estimates of immigrants’ labor supply assimilation profiles using the Current Population Survey Annual Demographic Files (March ADS) and the Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Groups (ORGs). We use a measure that is seemingly consistent across both surveys: usual weekly hours of work in the main...

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