Robert E. Wright, PhD, joined the University of Strathclyde in September 2005 as Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics in the Strathclyde Business School. From 1995 to 2005, he was Professor and University Chair in Economics in the Department of Economics at the University Stirling and Vice-Dean (Research) of the Faculty of Management. He is the Research Co-ordinator of the Demography and Social Justice Programme at the Scottish Economic Policy Network (SCOTECON) and the Director of the Scottish Graduate Programme in Economics (SGPE). A Canadian (born 1958), he studied at the University of Western Ontario, the University of Michigan, the University of Stockholm and at the National Institute of Demographic Research (INED) in Paris. He has been a Visiting Professor at DELTA in Paris and at the Universities of Amsterdam and Stockholm. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts; a Founding Fellow of the Institute of Contemporary Scotland; a Member of the Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education; and an Academician and Editorial Board Member of Academy of the Learned Societies for the Social Sciences. He is Past President of the European Society for Population Economics and President-elect of the Scottish Economics Society.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in October 1999.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11100

This paper examines the effect that working for pay and volunteering has on the mental health of older Irish women and men. Data from four waves of The Irish Longitudinal Study of Ageing (TILDA) are used. Three measures that capture different dimensions of mental health are considered. Ordinary least squares...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11085

This paper investigates the relationship between maternal employment and child outcomes using micro-data collected in the third wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing. A novel source of exogenous variation in the employment decisions of women is used to investigate this relationship. Between the 1920s and the 1970s in...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10633

This study combines novel financial-literacy data with measures of attitudes to redistribution from the British Election Study. We find a significant negative relationship between financial literacy and attitudes in favour of government intervention for income redistribution. The effect is robust to several specifications, samples, longitudinal models and instrumental variable regressions....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10285

This study examines the relationship between financial literacy and political orientation in Great Britain. Using novel data from the British Election Survey in 2014, we employ two distinct measures of political orientation, capturing individual self-assessment on a left-right axis and party preferences. We find that financially-literate individuals are some 11-19...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10046
Azhar Kahn, Twyeafur Rahman, Robert E. Wright

This paper examines the impact of micro-credit on employment. Household-level data was collected, following a quasi-experimental design, in Bangladesh and Pakistan. Three borrower groups are compared: Current borrowers; Pipeline borrowers and Non-borrowers. Pipeline borrowers are included to control for self-selection effects. It is argued that micro-credit causes a substitution of...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9835

A small but growing body of research suggests that retirement and cognitive decline are related. In fact, some have argued that retirement causes cognitive decline. The aim of this paper is to add to this literature using data of older women from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). Ordinary...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6668

This paper attempts to estimate the impact of population ageing on house prices. There is considerable debate about whether population ageing puts downwards or upwards pressure on house prices. The empirical approach differs from earlier studies of this relationship, which are mainly regression analyses of macro time-series data. A micro-simulation...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6253

This paper examines empirically the relationship between under-employment and migration amongst five cohorts of graduates of Scottish higher education institutions with micro-data collected by the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data indicate that there is a strong positive relationship between migration and graduate employment – those graduates who move after...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6177

This paper examines the persistence of under-employment amongst UK higher education graduates. For the cohort of individuals who graduated in 2002/3, micro-data collected by the Higher Education Statistical Agency, are used to calculate the rates of "non-graduate job" employment 6 months and 42 months after graduation. A logit regression analysis...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2623

This paper combines a multi-period economic Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) modelling framework with a demographic model to analyse the macroeconomic impact of the projected demographic trends in Scotland. Demographic trends are defined by the existing fertility-mortality rates and the level of annual net-migration. We employ a combination of a demographic...

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