Martin Halla is currently Professor at the University of Linz, Austria.

After he received a Ph.D. in Economics in 2007 from the University of Linz (supervised by Rudolf Winter-Ebmer) he was Visiting Scholar at the Institute for International Economic Studies, Stockholm University and at the Center for Labor Economics at the University of California, Berkeley.

His general research interests are applied microeconometrics, population economics, labour economics, and health economics. In 2008, he was awarded the prize for the best paper by a young economist at the conference of the European Association of Labour Economists in Amsterdam.

His research has been published in the Journal of the European Economic Association, the Journal of Health Economics, the Scandinavian Journal of Economics, and in the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics among others. He joined IZA as a Research Affiliate in May 2005 and became a Research Fellow in December 2011.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11199

The labor supply effects of becoming a grandmother are not well established in the empirical literature. We estimate the effect of becoming a grandmother on the labor supply decision of older workers. Under the assumption that grandmothers cannot predict the exact date of conception of their grandchild, we identify the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10969

This paper explores the historical origins of the cultural norm regarding illegitimacy (formerly known as bastardy). We test the hypothesis that traditional agricultural production structures influenced the historical illegitimacy ratio, and have had a lasting effect until today. Based on data from the Austro-Hungarian Empire and modern Austria, we show...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10812

We provide a novel interpretation of the estimated treatment effects from evaluations of parental leave reforms. Accounting for the counterfactual mode of care is crucial in the analysis of child outcomes and potential mediators. We evaluate a large and generous parental leave extension in Austria exploiting a sharp birthday cutoff-based...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10529

Does tax evasion run in the family? To answer this question, we study the case of the commuter tax allowance in Austria. This allowance is designed as a step function of the distance between the residence and the workplace, creating sharp discontinuities at each bracket threshold. The distance to these...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10095

As a consequence of World War II, Austria was divided into four different occupation zones for 10 years. Before tight travel restrictions came into place, about 11 percent of the population residing in the Soviet zone moved across the demarcation line. We exploit this large internal migration shock to further...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9928

Numerous papers report a negative association between parental divorce and child outcomes. To provide evidence whether this correlation is driven by a causal effect, we exploit idiosyncratic variation in the extent of sexual integration in fathers' workplaces: Fathers who encounter more women in their relevant age-occupation-group on-the-job are more likely...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9905

The incidence of Cesarean deliveries (CDs) has been on the rise. The procedure's cost and benefits are discussed controversially; in particular, since non-medically indicated cases seem widespread. We study the effect of CDs on subsequent fertility and maternal labor supply. Identification is achieved by exploiting variation in the supply-side's incentives...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9303
revised version forthcoming in: Journal of Health Economics

Early intervention is considered the optimal response to developmental disorders in children. We evaluate a nationwide developmental screening programme for preschoolers in Austria and the resulting interventions. Identification of treatment effects is determined by a birthday cutoff-based discontinuity in the eligibility for a financial incentive to participate in the screening....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9091

Social insurance programs typically comprise sick leave insurance. An important policy parameter is how the cost of sick leave are shared between workers, firms, and the social security system. We show that this sharing rule affects not only absence behavior, but also workers' subsequent health. To inform our empirical analysis...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8024

Prior empirical research on the theoretically proposed interaction between the quantity and the quality of children builds on exogenous variation in family size due to twin births and focuses on human capital outcomes. The typical finding can be described as a statistically nonsignificant two-stage least squares (2SLS) estimate, with substantial...

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