Elke J. Jahn is currently professor of labour economics at Bayreuth University and distinguished researcher at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB) Nuremberg. She was associate professor at Aarhus School of Business, Aarhus University between 2007 and 2009 and visiting scholar at the Center for European Studies, Harvard University during the academic year 2006/2007.

Her research focuses on temporary agency work, employment protection legislation, and migration.

Elke J. Jahn joined IZA as Research Fellow in March 2005.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10480

Social networks may affect workers' labor market outcomes. Using rich spatial data from administrative records, we analyze whether the employment status of neighbors influences the employment probability of a worker who lost his job due to a plant closure and the channels through which this occurs. Our findings suggest that...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9635

Using administrative data for West Germany, this paper investigates whether part of the urban wage premium stems from fierce competition in thick labour markets. We first establish that employers possess less wage-setting power in denser markets. Local differences in wage-setting power predict 1.1-1.6% higher wages from a 100 log points...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8803
forthcoming in: Industrial Relations

This paper evaluates the impact on temporary agency workers’ job satisfaction of a reform that considerably changed regulations covering the temporary help service sector in Germany. We isolate the causal effect of this reform by combining a difference-in-difference and matching approach and using rich survey data. We find that the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7776
substantially revised version published as "Do employers have more monopsony power in slack labor markets?" forthcoming in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review

This paper investigates the behaviour of employers' monopsony power and workers' wages over the business cycle. Using German administrative linked employer-employee data for the years 1985-2010 and an estimation framework based on duration models, we construct a time series of the firm-level labour supply elasticity and estimate its relationship to...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7240
published in: Labour Economics, 2014, 30, 212-222

This paper analyzes wage assimilation of ethnic German immigrants to Germany. We use unique administrative data that include a standardized measure of immigrants' pre-migration wage based on occupation, industry, tenure, qualification, and the German wage structure. We find that immigrants experience a substantial initial wage disadvantage compared to natives. During...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6713
published in: European Economic Review, 2014, 66, 205-225

We investigate the labor market effects of immigration in Denmark, Germany and the UK, three countries which are characterized by considerable differences in labor market institutions and welfare states. Institutions such as collective bargaining, minimum wages, employment protection and unemployment benefits affect the way in which wages respond to labor...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6472
substantially revised version published in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2015, 68 (3), 501-528

This paper investigates immigrants' and natives' labour supply to the firm within a semi-structural approach based on a dynamic monopsony framework. Applying duration models to a large administrative employer–employee data set for Germany, we find that once accounting for unobserved worker heterogeneity immigrants supply labour less elastically to firms than...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6471
published in: Macroeconomic Dynamics, 2016, 20(5), 1264-1281

This paper fills a gap in the literature by investigating whether temporary agency employment substitutes regular employment. To take into account the interaction between the two employment forms, we identify a SVAR model with correlated innovations by volatility regimes. We show that a positive shock to temporary agency employment increases...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6405
published in: Economics Letters, 2013, 118 (1), 225-228

We investigate whether agency employment is a bridge into regular employment for immigrants to Denmark using the timing-of-events approach. We provide evidence of large positive in-treatment effects, particularly for non-western immigrants and immigrants arriving during childhood. Post-treatment effects are fairly high for male non-western immigrants and immigrants from Eastern Europe.

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5837
published in: Labour Economics, 2013, 24, 48-57

It is a well-known fact that temporary agency workers have to accept high pay penalties. However, remarkably little is known about the remuneration of workers who are frequently employed in this sector or who are employed for a substantial length of time. Based on a rich administrative data set, we...

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