Abigail Wozniak is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Notre Dame, working primarily in the field of labor economics. Her research has examined migration between states and cities as well as employer compensation and screening policies. Professor Wozniak is currently a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn, Germany. Over 2014-2015, she served as Senior Economist to the White House Council of Economic Advisers, working on labor economics issues. She was a Visiting Fellow at Princeton University in 2008-09. She is a graduate of Harvard University (PhD) and the University of Chicago (AB). She is a Wisconsin native and a former Associate Economist at the Chicago Federal Reserve. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal,The Huffington Post, Businessweek, and other outlets.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11308
Susan Payne Carter, Abigail Wozniak

We use exogenously determined, long-distance relocations of U.S. Army soldiers to investigate the impact of moving on marriage. We find that marriage rates increase sharply around the time of a move in an event study analysis. Reduced form exposure analysis reveals that an additional move over a five year period...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8149
published in: Demography, 2017, 54(2): 631-653.

Interstate migration has decreased steadily since the 1980s. We show that this trend is not primarily related to demographic and socioeconomic factors, but instead appears to be connected to a concurrent secular decline in labor market transitions. We explore a number of reasons for the declines in geographic and labor...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6659
published in: Journal of Heatlh Economics, 2016, 50(2016):99-114.

We exploit exogenous variation in college completion induced by draft-avoidance behavior during the Vietnam War to examine the impact of college completion on adult mortality. Our preferred estimates imply that increasing college completion rates from the level of the state with the lowest induced rate to the highest would decrease...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6605
Review of Economics and Statistics, 2015, 93 (7), 548-566

Nearly half of U.S. employers test job applicants and workers for drugs. I use variation in the timing and nature of drug testing regulation to study discrimination against blacks related to perceived drug use. Black employment in the testing sector is suppressed in the absence of testing, consistent with ex...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5903
published in: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2011, 25 (3), 173-196

We review patterns in migration within the US over the past thirty years. Internal migration has fallen noticeably since the 1980s, reversing increases from earlier in the century. The decline in migration has been widespread across demographic and socioeconomic groups, as well as for moves of all distances. Although a...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5569
published in: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 2012,. 84(2), 600-617.

The distinct historical and cultural experiences of American blacks and whites may influence whether members of those groups perceive a particular exchange as fair. We investigate racial differences in fairness standards using preferences for equal treatment in the ultimatum game, where responders choose to allow a proposed division of a...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 3432
published in: Journal of Human Resources, 2012. 47(4), 913-950.

College-educated workers are twice as likely as high school graduates to make lasting long-distance moves, but little is known about the role of college itself in determining geographic mobility. Unobservable characteristics related to selection into college might also drive the relationship between college education and geographic mobility. We explore this...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2766
published in: Journal of Labor Economics, 2011, 29 (4). 697 - 739

This paper establishes the cyclical properties of a novel measure of worker reallocation: long-distance migration rates within the US. This internal migration offers a bird’s eye view of worker reallocation in the economy as long-distance migrants often change jobs or employment status, altering the spatial allocation of labor. Using historical...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1957
published in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2007, 60 (2), 246-267

This paper asks how deregulation intended to promote competition in the commercial banking industry affected the compensation structure for banking employees. Using establishment-based data from the Employment Cost Index Survey of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, I obtain measures of the level and distribution of wage and benefits compensation...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1954
published in: Journal of Human Resources, 2010, 45 (4), 944-970

It is unclear whether educational disparities in internal migration levels reflect important economic differences or simply different consumption choices. I answer this question empirically by testing for educational differentials in the likelihood that young workers undertake and succeed at arbitrage migration. I find that young college graduates are two to...

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