David Neumark (PhD in Economics, Harvard University, 1987) is Chancellor’s Professor of Economics at the University of California, Irvine, where he directs the Economic Self-Sufficiency Policy Research Institute (ESSPRI), and is a Visiting Scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

Prior to joining the faculty at UCI, Neumark was an Economist at the Federal Reserve Board, an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and a Professor at Michigan State University. He is also a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

He edits the IZA Journal of Labor Policy and co-edits the Journal of Urban Economics.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in October 2004.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11297

We study the effect of minimum wage increases on employment in automatable jobs – jobs in which employers may find it easier to substitute machines for people – focusing on low-skilled workers for whom such substitution may be spurred by minimum wage increases. Based on CPS data from 1980–2015, we...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 11168
David Neumark, Timothy Young

Research on the effects of enterprise zones – especially state programs – has generally failed to find evidence of beneficial effects such job growth or poverty reduction. In contrast, Ham, Swenson, Imrohoroğlu, and Song (2011, hereafter HSIS) present evidence that state and federal enterprise zones (EZs) established in the 1990s...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9852

We measure the impact of labor market referral networks defined by residential neighborhoods on re-employment following mass layoffs. Because networks can only be effective when hiring is occurring, we focus on a measure of the strength of the labor market network that includes not only the number of employed neighbors...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9529

The depth of the Great Recession, the slow recovery of job creation, the downward trend in labor force participation, high long-term unemployment, stagnant or declining wages for low-to-medium skill jobs owing to adverse labor demand shifts, and a greater rebound in low-wage than mid- or higher-wage jobs, raised concerns that...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9146
David Neumark, Diego Grijalva

State and federal policymakers grappling with the aftermath of the Great Recession sought ways to spur job creation, in many cases adopting hiring credits to encourage employers to create new jobs. However, there is virtually no evidence on the effects of these kinds of counter-recessionary hiring credits – the only...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7166

We revisit the minimum wage-employment debate, which is as old as the Department of Labor. In particular, we assess new studies claiming that the standard panel data approach used in much of the "new minimum wage research" is flawed because it fails to account for spatial heterogeneity. These new studies...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7114
published in: IZA Journal of Labor Policy, 2012, 1:11

We provide updated evidence on the effects of living wage laws in U.S. cities, relative to the earlier research covering only the first six or seven years of existence of these laws. There are some challenges to updating the evidence, as the CPS data on which it relies changed geographic...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7113

Policy researchers often have to estimate the future effect of imposing a policy in a particular location. There is often evidence on the effects of similar policies in other jurisdictions, but no information on the effects of the policy in the jurisdiction in question. And the policy may have specific...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6383

We test the hypothesis that local government officials in jurisdictions that have higher local sales taxes are more likely to use fiscal zoning to attract retailing. We find that total retail employment is not significantly affected by local sales tax rates, but employment in big box and anchor stores is...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5263

Audit studies testing for discrimination have been criticized because applicants from different groups may not appear identical to employers. Correspondence studies address this criticism by using fictitious paper applicants whose qualifications can be made identical across groups. However, Heckman and Siegelman (1993) show that group differences in the variance of...

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