Xin Meng received her Ph.D. in Economics from the Australian National University in 1993. She is currently a professor at The Australian National University.
Her research to date consists of four main themes: 1. the Chinese labour market during transition, including changes in income distribution and poverty, the impact of labour market rigidities on economic development, and the effect of economic shocks on consumption; 2. the influence of institutions and culture on gender discrimination in China, Taiwan, and developed countries; 3. economic assimilation of immigrants in developed countries; 4. economic implications of major catastrophes, such as the impact of the Chinese famine and Cultural Revolution on life time earnings and welfare of individuals and families.
Xin Meng has published papers in the Journal of Labour Economics, Labour Economics, Journal of Public Economics, Oxford Economic Papers, Journal of Development and Cultural Change, Review of Income and Wealth, Journal of Comparative Economics and Journal of Population Economics.

She joined IZA as a Research Fellow in June 2006.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10603

This paper analyses the relation between individual migrations and the risk attitudes of other household members when migration is a household decision. We develop a simple model that implies that which member migrates depends on the distribution of risk attitudes among all household members, and that the risk diversification gain...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10481
Xin Meng, Sen Xue

Over the past two decades, more than 160 million rural residents have migrated to cities in China. They are usually separated from their rural families and work in an unfamiliar, and sometimes hostile, city environment. This paper investigates to what extent city social networks alleviate mental health problems among these...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10460
Xin Meng, Guochang Zhao

Between 1966 and 1976, China experienced a Cultural Revolution (CR). During this period, the education of around 17 birth cohorts was interrupted by between 1 and 8 years. In this paper we examine whether, and by how much, this large-scale schooling interruption affected their children's education. We find a strong...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10364
Forthcoming in: The Economic Journal, 2018.

In the laboratory experiment reported in this paper we explore how evolving institutions and social norms, which we label 'culture', change individuals' preferences and behaviour in mainland China. From 1949 China experienced dramatic changes in its socio-economic institutions. These began with communist central planning and the establishment of new social...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9747

This paper uses survey and experimental data from prison inmates and comparable non-inmates to examine the drivers of rising criminality in China. Consistent with socio-biological research on other species, we find that China's high sex-ratios are associated with greater risk-taking and impatience amongst males. These underlying behavioral impacts explain some...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9165

In the past 15 years around 160 million Chinese rural workers migrated to cities to work. Because of restrictions on migrant access to local health and education system a large cohort of migrant children are left-behind in rural villages and growing up without parental care. This paper examines how parental...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5967

We use a unique data of representative migrants and urban local workers in 15 Chinese cities to investigate entrepreneurship and credit constraints under labour market discrimination. We divide self employed into prefer to be self-employed and prefer to have a salaried job but cannot find one; and divide salaried workers...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 5288

Hundreds of millions of rural migrants have moved into Chinese cities since the early 1990s contributing greatly to economic growth, yet, they are often blamed for reducing urban 'native' workers’ employment opportunities, suppressing their wages and increasing pressure on infrastructure and other public facilities. This paper examines the causal relationship...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4919
published in: Journal of Comparative Economics, 2013, 41 (1), 227–244

In the past 20 years the average real earnings of Chinese urban male workers have increased by 350 per cent. Accompanying this unprecedented growth is a considerable increase in earnings inequality. Between 1988 and 2007 the variance of log earnings increased from 0.27 to 0.48, a 78 per cent increase....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4811

This paper estimates the intergenerational income elasticity for urban China, paying careful attention to the potential biases induced by income fluctuations and life cycle effects. Our preferred estimates are that the intergenerational income elasticities are 0.74 for father-son, 0.84 for father-daughter, 0.33 for mother-son, and 0.47 for mother-daughter. This suggests...

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