Konstantinos Tatsiramos

Program Coordinator and Visiting Research Fellow

University of Luxembourg, LISER

Konstantinos Tatsiramos holds a Joint Professorship in Labor Economics at the University of Luxembourg and LISER. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from the European University Institute in Florence, an M.Sc. in Economics from University College London and a B.Sc. in Economics from Athens University of Economics and Business. Prior to joining the University of Luxembourg and LISER he worked as an Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham (2013-2017), as a Reader and Lecturer at the University of Leicester (2011-2013) and as a Researcher at IZA from 2005 to 2011.

His main research interests lie in labor economics and applied micro-econometrics, with particular emphasis on labor market institutions, unemployment dynamics and mobility. His research has been published in the Journal of the European Economic Association, the European Economic Review, and the Journal of Applied Econometrics, among others.

He is the IZA Co-Editor of "Research in Labor Economics" since 2007, one of the Program Coordinators for the IZA Research Area "Labor Market Institutions" since 2008, and the IZA World of Labor Subject Editor on "Demography, Family and Gender" since 2014.

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Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2792
revised version published in: Labour Economics, 2009, 16(2), 161-170

Many studies have explored the determinants of entering into entrepreneurship and the differences in self-employment rates across racial and ethnic groups. However, very little is known about the survival in entrepreneurship of immigrants to the U.S. and their descendants. Employing data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2537
substantially revised version published in: IZA Journal of Migration, 2012, 1, Article 5 [Open Access]

The paper investigates the role of social norms as a determinant of individual attitudes by analyzing risk proclivity reported by immigrants and natives in a unique representative German survey. We employ factor analysis to construct measures of immigrants' ethnic persistence and assimilation. The estimated effect of these measures on risk...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2435

This paper investigates the determinants of residential mobility of older households (above 50 years old) and the adjustment of housing for those who move employing individual data from the European Community Household Panel. Although homeowners are less likely to move compared to renters, an increase in mobility rates is observed...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2280
revised version published in: Journal of the European Economic Association, 2009, 7(6), 1225-1260

The empirical literature on unemployment insurance has focused on its direct effect on unemployment duration, while the potential indirect effect on employment stability through a more efficient matching process, as the unemployed can search for a longer period, has attracted much less attention. In the European context this is surprising...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1999
published in: Applied Economics Letters, 2009, 16 (15), 1581-1586

This paper questions the perceived wisdom that migrants are more risk-loving than the native population. We employ a new large German survey of direct individual risk measures to find that first-generation migrants have lower risk attitudes than natives, which only equalize in the second generation.

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1706
substantially revised paper appeared as DP No. 3853

We use eight waves from the European Community Household Panel (1994-2001) to analyze the intertemporal labor supply behavior of married women in six European countries (Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, Germany and United Kingdom) using dynamic binary choice models with different initial condition solutions and non parametric distributions of unobserved heterogeneity....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1253
substantially revised version published in: Journal of Population Economics, 2009, 22(2), 267-283

Conventional wisdom suggests that unemployment benefits create a stronger geographic attachment by lowering the willingness of the unemployed to accept job offers. We assess empirically the effect of benefits on geographic labour mobility using individual data from the European Community Household Panel for France, Germany, Spain, and the UK. Contrary...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1163
substantially revised version appeared as DP No. 2280

This paper studies the effect of unemployment benefits on the unemployment and subsequent employment duration using individual data from the European Community Household Panel, for France, Germany, and the UK. The empirical analysis is based on a two-state mixed proportional hazard model allowing for flexible duration dependence and state specific...

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