Daniel S. Hamermesh

Chief Coordinator, IZA Network; Editor-in-Chief, IZA World of Labor

Barnard College

Daniel S. Hamermesh is Distinguished Scholar, Barnard College, Professor Emeritus, Royal Holloway University of London, and Sue Killam Professor Emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin and. His A.B. is from the University of Chicago (1965), his Ph.D. from Yale (1969). He taught from 1969-73 at Princeton, from 1973-93 at Michigan State, from 2009-12 at Maastricht University, and has held visiting professorships in the United States, Europe, Australia and Asia. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and was President of the Society of Labor Economists in 2001. In 2013 that Society gave him the Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions; he was awarded the IZA Labor Prize; and he received the John R. Commons Award from Omicron Delta Epsilon.

He authored Labor Demand, The Economics of Work and Pay, Economics Is Everywhere, Beauty Pays, and a wide array of articles in labor economics in the leading general and specialized economics journals.

His research concentrates on time use, labor demand, discrimination, social insurance programs (particularly unemployment insurance), and unusual applications of labor economics (to suicide, sleep and beauty).

He joined IZA as a research fellow in July 1998. From December 2001 until July 2008, he was IZA Program Director for the institute's research program "The Future of Labor." He served as IZA Director of Research from August 2008 until January 2009.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 11266

Using Current Population Survey data, I demonstrate a 15-percentage point wage disadvantage among academics compared to all other doctorate-holders with the same demographics. Time-diary data show that academics' workhours are distributed more evenly over the week and day, although their total workweeks are equally long. This smoother distribution of work...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10496

Evidence from the American Time Use Survey 2003-12 suggests the existence of small but statistically significant racial/ethnic differences in time spent not working at the workplace. Minorities, especially men, spend a greater fraction of their workdays not working than do white non-Hispanics. These differences are robust to the inclusion of...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10404

We measure the impact of measurement error in labor-supply elasticities estimated over recalled usual work hours, as is ubiquitous in the literature. Employing hours of work in diaries collected by the American Time Use Survey, 2003-12, along with the same respondents' recalled usual hours, we show that the latter yield...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10403
published in: American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 2017, 107(5): 37–40

Examining the most heavily-cited publications in labor economics from the early 1990s, I show that few of over 3000 articles citing them directly replicates them. They are replicated more frequently using data from other time periods and economies, so that the validity of their central ideas has typically been verified....

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9593
forthcoming in: Journal of Economic Literature, 2017

I describe and compare sources of data on citations in economics and the statistics that can be constructed from them. Constructing data sets of the post-publication citation histories of articles published in the "Top 5" journals in the 1970s and the 2000s, I examine distributions and life cycles of citations,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9095

Using the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) 2003-12, we estimate time spent by workers in non-work while on the job. Non-work time is substantial and varies positively with the local unemployment rate. While the average time spent by workers in non-work conditional on any positive non-work rises with the unemployment...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8828

The previously documented trend toward more co- and multi-authored research in economics is partly (perhaps 20 percent) due to different research styles of scholars in different birth cohorts (of different ages). Most of the trend reflects profession-wide changes in research style. Older scholars show greater variation in their research styles...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8793
Forthcoming in European Economic Review, 2017. doi:10.1016/j.euroecorev.2016.12.012

We use longitudinal data describing couples in Australia from 2001-12 and Germany from 2002-12 to examine how demographic events affect perceived time and financial stress. Consistent with the view of measures of stress as proxies for the Lagrangean multipliers in models of household production, we show that births increase time...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8423
published in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2015, 68 (5), 1007-1018

American workweeks are long compared to other rich countries'. Much less well-known is that Americans are more likely to work at night and on weekends. We examine the relationship between these two phenomena using the American Time Use Survey and time-diary data from 5 other countries. Adjusting for demographic differences,...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8077
published in: Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, 2017, Vol. 44, 1-12

Are workers in modern economies working "too hard" – would they be better off if an equilibrium with fewer work hours were achieved? We examine changes in life satisfaction of Japanese and Koreans over a period when hours of work were cut exogenously because employers suddenly faced an overtime penalty...