Marco Francesconi has been a Professor of Economics at the University of Essex since September 2004. Previously he has worked for nine years at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex, where he continues to be a Research Fellow. He is also a Research Associate of the Institute for Fiscal Studies (London), and a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (London) and the Centre for Household Income Labour and Demographic economics (Torino).

Marco's main area of research is labor economics, with special interest in family economics, intergenerational links and labor market dynamics. His recent work has appeared in the Economic Journal, Journal of Labor Economics, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Internatioanl Economic Review, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Human Resources, and Journal of Economic Theory.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in October 1999.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 11361

We use data from six cohorts of university graduates in Germany to assess the extent of gender gaps in college and labor market performance twelve to eighteen months after graduation. Men and women enter college in roughly equal numbers, but more women than men complete their degrees. Women enter college...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10827
revised version forthcoming in: Journal of Political Economy

This paper develops a new equilibrium model of two-sided search where ex-ante heterogenous individuals have general payoff functions and vectors of attributes. The analysis applies to a large class of models, from the non-transferable utility case to the collective household case with bargaining. The approach is powerful for it identifies...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10679

In 2009, Russia introduced a reform that changed the admissions process in all universities. Before 2009, admission decisions were based on institution-specific entry exams; the reform required universities to determine their decisions on the results of a national high-school test known as Unified State Exam (USE). One of the main...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9977
published in: Economic Journal, 2016, 126(596), F1-F27

This paper introduces the EJ Symposium on Child Development by reviewing the literature and placing the contributions of the papers in the Symposium in the context of a vibrant literature.

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8849

We estimate the effect of binge drinking on accident and emergency attendances, road accidents, arrests, and the number of police officers on duty using a variety of unique data from Britain and a two-sample minimum distance estimation procedure. Our estimates, which reveal sizeable effects of bingeing on all outcomes, are...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8813

Using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), we make two contributions to the literature on end-of-life transfers. First, we show that unequal bequests are much more common than generally recognized, with one-third of parents with wills planning to divide their estates unequally among their children. These plans for...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8608
published in: Economic Journal, 2016, 126(596), F96-F135

Using large longitudinal survey data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study, this paper estimates the effect of maternal time inputs on early child development. We find that maternal time is a quantitatively important determinant of skill formation and that its effect declines with child age. There is evidence of a...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7064

We examine the effect of joint custody on marriage, divorce, fertility and female employment in Austria using individual-level administrative data, covering the entire population. We also use unique data obtained from court records to analyze the effect on post-divorce outcomes. Our estimates show that joint custody significantly reduces divorce and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6050

This paper formulates a simple model of female labor force decisions which embeds an in-work benefit reform and explicitly allows for announcement and implementation effects. We explore several mechanisms through which women can respond to the announcement of a reform that increases in-work benefits, including sources of intertemporal substitution, human...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 4637
revised version published as 'An Evolutionary Theory of Monogamy', Journal of Economic Theory, 2016, 166(November), 605--628

This paper presents an overlapping generations model to explain why humans live in families rather than in other pair groupings. Since most non-human species are not familial, something special must be behind the family. It is shown that the two necessary features that explain the origin of the family are...