Nauro Campos is Professor of Economics at Brunel University London and Research Professor at ETH-Zürich. His main fields of interest are political economy and European integration. He has taught at the Universities of Bonn, Brunel, CERGE-EI, Newcastle, Paris 1 Sorbonne and Warwick. He was a Fulbright Fellow at Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore), a Robert McNamara Fellow at The World Bank, and a CBS Fellow at Oxford University. He is a Research Fellow at IZA-Bonn, a Professorial Fellow at UNU-MERIT (Maastricht University), a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the (Central) Bank of Finland, and a Senior Fellow of the ESRC Peer Review College. He was a visiting scholar (often more than once) at the IMF, World Bank, European Commission, University of Michigan, ETH, USC, Bonn, UCL and Stockholm. From 2009 to 2014, he was seconded as Senior Economic Advisor/SRF to the Chief Economist of the Department for International Development (under both Winters and Dercon.) He received his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (Los Angeles) in 1997, where he was lucky enough to learn about institutions from Jeff Nugent and Jim Robinson and (more than) happy to be Dick Easterlin’s RA for three years.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in September 2005.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 2638
Ian Babetskii, Nauro F Campos
published in: Journal of Comparative Economics, 2011, 39 (2), 140-158

Why are socially beneficial reforms not implemented? One simple answer to this question (which has received little attention in the literature) is that this may be caused by generalized uncertainty about the effectiveness of reforms. If agents are unsure about whether a proposed reform will work, it will be less...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2502
John Beirne, Nauro F Campos
published in: Economics of Transition, 2007, 15 (1), 57-76

Conventional wisdom suggests that the stocks of human capital were one of the few positive legacies from communism. However, if factories under communism were so inefficient, why would the education system not have been? Using the education production function approach and new data on educational inputs and outcomes from 1960...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2313
published in: Public Choice, 2007, 131 (1), 1-21

Conventional wisdom suggests that lobbying is the preferred mean for exerting political influence in rich countries and corruption the preferred one in poor countries. Analyses of their joint effects are understandably rare. This paper provides a theoretical framework that focus on the relationship between lobbying and corruption (that is, it...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2217
published as 'Crises, What Crises? New Evidence on the Relative Roles of Political and Economic Crises in Begetting Reforms' in: Journal of Development Studies, 2010, 46 (10), 1670-1691, Winner of Dudley Seers Prize

Recent research convincingly shows that crises beget reform. Although the consensus is that economic crises foster macroeconomic stabilization, it is silent on which types of crises cause which types of reform. Is it economic or political crises that are the most important drivers of structural reforms? To answer this question...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 2093
published in: European Journal of Political Economy, 2012, 28 (2), 227-237

We construct objective measures of privatization, internal and external liberalization reform efforts, across countries over time, and investigate their determinants, reversals and macroeconomic impacts. We find that GDP growth determines external liberalization and privatization, concentration of political power drives internal liberalization, and democracy underpins all three. We find that FDI...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 1867
published in: Journal of Law and Economics, 2006, 49 (2), 681-706

During the transition from plan to market, managers and politicians succeeded in maintaining control of large parts of the stock of socialist physical capital. Despite the obvious importance of this phenomenon, there have been no efforts to model, measure and investigate this process empirically. This paper tries to fill this...