Professor at the Central European University in Budapest, Acting Head of its School of Public Policy, and Founder and Scientific Director of CELSI, Bratislava. Research Associate at the university of Economics in Bratislava.

Fellow of Global Labor Organization and POP UNU-MERIT.

Former Visiting Research Fellow, Deputy Program Director "Migration", the leader of the research sub-area EU Enlargement and the Labor Markets and former Deputy Director of Research (2009) at IZA. Visiting Research Fellow at Harvard University's Labor and Worklife Program in 2014-15.

Member of several professional associations (AEA, ESPE, EALE, EEA) and a founding member, vice-President, and Fellow of the Slovak Economic Association.

His main research interests are labor and population economics, ethnicity, migration, and reforms in Central Eastern European labor markets. Martin Kahanec has published in peer-reviewed academic journals, contributed chapters in collected volumes including the Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality (OxfordUP) and the International Handbook on the Economics of Migration (Edward Elgar), and he has edited several scientific book volumes and journal special issues.

He is the founding Managing Editor of the IZA Journal of European Labor Studies (in 2016 included in Scopus), Associate Editor of the International Journal of Manpower (SSCI, Scopus, ...), and member of the Editorial Board of Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research (Scopus, ...).

Martin Kahanec has held several advisory positions and leading roles in a number of scientific and policy projects with the World Bank, the European Commission, OECD, and other international and national institutions.

Martin Kahanec earned his Ph.D. in Economics in 2006 from the Center for Economic Research (CentER), Tilburg University, the Netherlands. He earned his Master's degree from the Central European University in Budapest as well as from the Faculty of management, Comenius University, in Bratislava in 2000, where he also earned his Bachelor's degree in 1998.



IZA Discussion Paper No. 10443
published in: International Journal of Manpower, 2017, 38 (7), 996-1015. Article

The economic literature starting with Borjas (2001) suggests that immigrants are more flexible than natives in responding to changing sectoral, occupational, and spatial shortages in the labor market. In this paper, we study the relative responsiveness to labor shortages by immigrants from various origins, skills and tenure in the country...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 10381
published in: Empirica, 2017, 44(3): 407-434.

This study contributes to the literature on destination-country consequences of international migration with investigations on the effects of immigration from new EU member states and Eastern Partnership countries on the economies of old EU member states over the years 1995-2010. Using a rich international migration dataset and an empirical model...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 9108

Theoretical arguments and previous country-level evidence indicate that immigrants are more fluid than natives in responding to changing labor shortages across countries, skill-groups or industries. The diversity across EU member states enables us to test this hypothesis across various institutional, economic and policy contexts. Drawing on the EU LFS and...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8847

The role of institutions in immigrant integration remains underexplored in spite of its essential significance for integration policies. This paper adopts the Varieties of Capitalism framework to study the institutional determinants of Immigrant-Native gaps in host labor markets. Using the EU LFS we first measure immigrant-native gaps in labor force...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8456
published in: M. Kahanec and K.F. Zimmermann (eds.), Labor Migration, EU Enlargement, and the Great Recession, Springer: Berlin, et al. 2016, 1-34

The eastern enlargements of the European Union (EU) and the extension of the free movement of workers to the new member states' citizens unleashed significant east-west migration flows in a labor market with more than half a billion people. Although many old member states applied transitional arrangements temporarily restricting the...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8249
published in: M. Kahanec and K.F. Zimmermann (eds.), Labor Migration, EU Enlargement, and the Great Recession, Springer: Berlin, et al. 2016, 1-34

This paper evaluates the mobility patterns of Slovaks into the rest of the European Union (EU) following Slovakia's EU accession in 2004 and through the Great Recession. Combining information from various data sources including the Slovak Labor Force Survey and conducting our own statistical analysis of selectivity into migration, we...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7634
published as 'Projections of Potential Flows to the Enlarging EU from Ukraine, Croatia and other Eastern Neighbors' in: IZA Journal of Migration, 2015, 4:6

This study evaluates potential migration flows to the European Union from its eastern neighbors and Croatia. We perform out-of-sample forecasts using an adaption of the model of Hatton (1995) to time series cross-sectional data about post-enlargement migration flows following the EU's 2004 enlargement. We consider two baseline policy scenarios, with...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 7285
published in: Transfer: European Review of Labor and Research, 2013, 19 (3), 365-380

This paper studies the migration response of the youth from new EU member states to disparate conditions in an enlarged European Union at the onset of the Great Recession. We use the Eurobarometer data and probabilistic econometric models to identify the key drivers of the intention to work in another...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6485
published in: A. F. Constant, K. F. Zimmermann (eds.), International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, Edward Elgar 2013, Cheltenham, UK, and Northampton, pp. 137-152

The 2004 and 2007 enlargements of the EU extended the freedom of movement to workers from the twelve new member states mainly from Central Eastern Europe. This study summarizes and comparatively evaluates what we know about mobility in an enlarged Europe to date. The pre-enlargement fears of free labor mobility...

IZA Discussion Paper No. 6260
published in: International Journal of Manpower, 2013, 34 (1), 39-55.

This paper's main purpose is to gauge immigrants' demand for social assistance and services and identify the key barriers to social and labor market inclusion of immigrants in the European Union. The data from an online primary survey of experts from organizations working on immigrant integration in the EU is...