Daniel I. Rees

Research Fellow

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

Daniel I. Rees is a professor in the Department of Economics at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and a coeditor of the American Journal of Health Economics. He received his B.A. from Oberlin College in 1986, his M.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1988, and his Ph.D. from the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations in 1992. He was a professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Colorado Denver from 1993-2021 and Editor-in-Chief of the Economics of Education Review from 2014-2019.

Professor Rees is interested in a wide range of topics including the determinants of risky adolescent behavior and the effects of prenatal stress on child health. He is currently studying the mortality transition at the turn of the 20th century, the relationship between hospital desegregation and the Black-White infant mortality gap, and the long-term effects of smoking on health.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in February 2011.

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IZA Publications

IZA Discussion Paper No. 8965
published in: Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 2018, 88, 379-395
IZA Discussion Paper No. 8718
published in: Economic Journal, 2018, 128 (611), 1333-1366
IZA Discussion Paper No. 7761
published in: Journal of Law and Economics, 2015, 58 (1), 235-267
IZA Discussion Paper No. 7469
published in the World Bank Economic Review, 2020, 34 (3), 767-789
IZA Discussion Paper No. 7048
published in: International Review of Law and Economics, 2015, 42, 122 - 134
IZA Discussion Paper No. 7034
published in: Health Economics, 2015, 24 (6), 659-671
IZA Discussion Paper No. 6592
published in: American Law and Economics Review, 2015,17 (2), 495-528
IZA Discussion Paper No. 6280
published as 'Medical Marijuana Laws and Suicides by Gender and Age' in: American Journal of Public Health, 2014, 104 (12), 2369-2376
IZA Discussion Paper No. 6112
published in: Journal of Law and Economics, 2013, 56 (2), 333-369
IZA Discussion Paper No. 5781
published in: Economics of Education Review, 2014, 38, 76-88
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